Tag Archives: Coriander

Coriander-Did You Know?

Coriander seeds.png

Coriander and cilantro come from the same plant. The word coriander can be used to describe the entire plant: leaves, stems, seeds, and all. Most people are referring to the spice produced from the seeds of the coriander plant. The leaves of the plant are commonly called cilantro, which comes from the Spanish word for coriander.

The change in names is very appropriate, since the plant’s leaves and the ripened seeds taste totally different. Cilantro on the other hand is a little too different for many more delicate taste buds, unfortunately. Most people either enjoy or greatly dislike the taste, but I can see why some people argue that it’s an acquired taste.

It’s a different story for the seeds. Coriander is an extremely popular spice with a pleasing aroma and lemony flavor, found in many recipes. Little is known about the origins of the coriander plant, although it is generally thought to be native to the Mediterranean and parts of southwestern Europe.

More recently, coriander plants were known to be growing in Massachusetts by the early 1600’s, one of the first herbs grown by the American colonists. Coriander essential oil promotes digestion and eases stomach upset, aids in a healthy insulin response, soothes joint and muscle pain. Coriander essential oil is also know for toning and rejuvenating to the skin.

Essential Oils Studied For Anti-Infectious Properties

Anti-Infectious Properties
Anti-Infectious means an agent that prevents and combats the spread of germs.

Basil Essential Oil

Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.
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Cassia Essential Oil
When diluted, Cassia can help soothe sore, achy joints. Cassia can be used in cooking either as a replacement for Cinnamon in pies and breads, or by itself in many different entrees and desserts.
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Cedarwood Essential Oil
Diffusing or inhaling Cedarwood will help maintain healthy breathing and respiratory function and, when applied topically, Cedarwood promotes clear, healthy skin.
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Cinnamon Essential Oil

Cinnamon is strong, so be sure to dilute it (3 drops of carrier oil to 1 drop of cinnamon), but you can cook, bake, or even make candy with it too.
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Clary Sage Essential Oil
The main chemical component of Clary Sage is linalyl acetate, part of the esters group, making it one of the most relaxing, soothing, and balancing essential oils.
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Clove Essential Oil

Clove has been used for years in dental preparations,candy, and gum for its flavor and ability to promote oral health, yet it provides a myriad of health benefits.
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Coriander Essential Oil
Coriander has a high linalool content, giving it strengthening and toning properties that benefit the skin, emotions, and body.
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Geranium Essential Oil

This oil has been used to promote clear skin and healthy hair, making it ideal for skin and hair care products. It also helps calm nerves and lessen stress.
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Marjoram Essential Oil
Marjoram oil is noted for it’s calming properties, can be taken internally, or used topically, although sensitive skin may want to dilute and it. One drop of essential oil is equivalent to 2 tsp. of dried herbs.
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Melaleuca Essential Oil
Melaleuca is best known for its purifying properties. It can be used to cleanse and purify. Taken internally, Melaleuca enhances immunity when seasonal threats are high.
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Myrrh Essential Oil

Myrrh is valued as an expectorant, which means it promotes the expulsion of mucus in cases of bronchitis and lung congestion. Myrrh is best for chronic conditions, because it contains tannins and resins, it has an astringent effect on tissues.
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Oregano Essential Oil
Oregano is one of the most potent essential oils. It must be diluted (3 drops of carrier oil to 1 drop of Oregano essential oil when used topically). Apply to reflex points. It can be used as a flavoring in cooking.
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Patchouli Essential Oil
Patchouli is regularly used in the perfume industry as well as in scented products. The fragrance of Patchouli provides a grounding, balancing effect on emotions.
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Peppermint Essential Oil

Peppermint is very pleasing to the taste buds (you can add the oil to tea or water), but is powerfully soothing to the digestive system. You can usually apply it without diluting, inhale for nausea, or take internally as suggested.
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Thyme Essential Oil

Thyme makes a great defense against many concerns, although it should always be diluted (4 drops carrier oil to 1 drop thyme). You can also cook with it.
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Cilantro-Did You Know?

Coriander:Cilantro-did you knowDid you know Cilantro essential oil is the oil of releasing control? Cilantro makes the detoxification of emotions and debris. It is helpful in lightening your load through the release of issues buried in the body, heart and soul. Those in need of cilantro may attempt to obsessively control other people or manage their surrounding and conditions.

It is a mystery as to where Cilantro originated, but it is thought by many to be from the Mediterranean region of Europe. No one knows exactly, but it appears that cilantro has been used for at least 5000 years. The seeds, also known as coriander, have even been found in ancient Egyptian tombs. Perhaps this was because the coriander seeds were thought by the ancient herbalists to be an aphrodisiac.

The therapeutic and culinary uses of Cilantro have been documented for centuries. Cilantro has been studied for antioxidants known to protect the body’s cells from oxidative stress. Cilantro promotes healthy digestion and acts as a powerful cleanser and detoxifier for the body’s systems. Applied topically, Cilantro is very soothing and cooling to the skin, and it adds a fresh, herbal aroma to any essential oil blend when diffused.

There is also a large amount of literature speculating that cilantro may be an effective chellation therapy for people who have excess mercury in their systems. Some think that mercury poisoning could be the result of metallic teeth fillings. Every time a person with fillings chews, the fillings release minute amounts of mercury gas that may be breathed into the system. Of course, this is all speculative and disputed. Nevertheless, many people who have suffered from mercury poisoning and the “brain cloud” it causes have reported fairly rapid relief by the consistent consumption of cilantro over a period of just a few weeks.

Cilantro’s culinary uses are endless, adding a flavorful twist to meats, salads, dips, and guacamole. A small amount goes a long way, sometimes a drop is too much and overpowering. Just dipping a toothpick into an essential oil bottle, then using the toothpick for stirring is sufficient.

Coriander-Did You Know?

Coriander:Cilantro-did you knowDid you know Coriander is the oil of loyalty, specifically loyalty to oneself? The individual in need of Coriander oil may be stuck in a cycle of always putting the needs of others ahead of their own. Coriander changes the focus of a person from doing things for the acceptance of others to honoring, and living from ones true self.

Coriander and cilantro come from the same plant. The word coriander can be used to describe the entire plant: leaves, stems, seeds, and all. Most people are referring to the spice produced from the seeds of the coriander plant. The leaves of the plant are commonly called cilantro, which comes from the Spanish word for coriander.

The change in names is very appropriate, since the plant’s leaves and the ripened seeds taste totally different. Cilantro on the other hand is a little too different for many more delicate taste buds, unfortunately. Most people either enjoy or greatly dislike the taste, but I can see why some people argue that it’s an acquired taste.

It’s a different story for the seeds. Coriander is an extremely popular spice with a pleasing aroma and lemony flavor, found in many recipes. Little is known about the origins of the coriander plant, although it is generally thought to be native to the Mediterranean and parts of southwestern Europe.

More recently, coriander plants were known to be growing in Massachusetts by the early 1600’s, one of the first herbs grown by the American colonists. Coriander essential oil promotes digestion and eases stomach upset, aids in a healthy insulin response, soothes joint and muscle pain. Coriander essential oil is also know for toning and rejuvenating to the skin.