Tag Archives: used in cooking

Thyme-Did You Know?

ThymeDid you know Thyme is the oil of releasing and forgiving? Thyme is one of the most compelling cleansers of our emotions and supports us in response to the concerns of trapped feelings that have been buried for a long time.

Thyme was also associated with courage, bravery and strength in ancient times? For thousands of years, thyme has been a big part of the herb garden, used as an antidote for poison, a plague preventative, a symbol of bravery in battle, and a reliable companion to the grave. Thyme has a far more interesting past than you’d think if you were walking past it in the grocery store today.

Thyme’s reputation as a healer and protector goes back many centuries. Thyme was also associated with bravery, courage, and strength in ancient times. Roman soldiers exchanged sprigs of thyme as a sign of respect. Greeks and Romans burned bundles of thyme to purify their temples and homes, and to recall a spirit of courage in those who inhaled it.

When cooking with thyme, use 1-2 drops in meat and entrée dishes to add a fresh herbal flavor. When using topically, dilute with fractionated coconut oil. Then apply to targeted areas on the skin to purify and promote healthy skin. Add 2 drops to veggie capsules and take internally during winter time to promote immunity.

Tangerine-Did You Know?

TangerineDid you know tangerineʼs have strong qualities of cheer and joyfulness? People who at times feel overwhelmed by responsibility would benefit from the the uplifting vibration that comes from tangerineʼs. Another important aspect of tangerine is itʼs ability to help us access our creative energy within our spirit.

The name tangerine comes from Tangier, a port of Morocco, where the first ship with Mandarin oranges arrived from China? This citrus fruit is believed to have originated in Southeastern Asia and since then it has been widely cultivated in different parts of the world.

A tangerine orange is smaller than a regular orange, and contains a strong pleasant fragrance. The fruit is quite fragile but the sections are easy to separate. A medium tangerine provides about 37 calories of food value, the fruit is not only delicious, it is an important addition to any diet.

Tangerine essential oil is great to use when cooking. Tangerine oil contains esters and aldehydes which are sedating and calming to the nervous system and has been studied for its ability to sooth emotions such as grief anger and shock. Like most citrus oils, avoid direct sunlight or UV light for up to 12 hours after using on the skin.

Marjoram-Did You Know?

 

Marjoram
Did you know Marjoram essential oil is the oil of Connection? Marjoram assists people who are unable to trust others or form a serious relationship. Being unable to trust often originates from unpleasant life experiences. Marjoram teaches that trust is the foundation for all human relationships.

Marjoram is surrounded by mythology. People thought marjoram was created by the greek goddess Venus who gifted it with its pleasant sweet flavor and aroma. This is one of the most desired sought after herbs by Aphrodite. People believed that when an unmarried girl kept a marjoram plant in her bed she would see Aphrodite in her dreams, who would then reveal to her, a prospective husband.

By the middle ages, marjoram was worn by couples as garlands to represent love, warm respect, and contentment. It was also added in the food to encourage devotion. Due to its sweet aroma, it was frequently used as deodorant and carried in bouquets and sweet bags. People of England used marjoram as a preservative.

Marjoram was known to the Greeks and Romans as a symbol of happiness. Marjoram has been used in culinary dishes, imparting a unique flavor to soups, stews, dressings, and sauces. In Germany, Marjoram is known as the “Goose Herb” for its traditional use in roasting geese.

In traditional Austrian medicine, Marjoram was used to promote gastrointestinal health and to purify the skin. In modern applications, Marjoram is valued for its calming properties, and for its positive effect on the nervous system. It also soothes tired, stressed muscles, and supports both healthy cardiovascular, and respiratory systems.

Cassia-Did You Know?

Cassia-Did You KnowDid you you know Cassia is the oil of Self Assurance? Cassia brings pleased delight, and the ability to do things that might frighten you. It is a delightful remedy for those that show nervousness or have a lack of courage. Cassia helps people with a feeling of doubt or disbelief by replacing these feelings with self assurance. Cassia helps people in self discovery of their authentic self.

Cassia is mentioned three times directly in the Bible, and mentioned over 65 times indirectly. It is a fragrant, aromatic bark and was probably used in a powdered form, and as one of the perfumes at funerals. Cassia, like cinnamon, was used by the Romans. Cassia was recorded in one of the oldest known medical records. It was in the Ebers papyrus an ancient book that contains over 800 recipes.

Cassia is a close relative to Cinnamon, has a strong, spicy aroma that can be used in small quantities to transform any essential oil blend. Cassia has been used for thousands of years to maintain physical health and promote emotional well-being. Cassia has an unmistakable fragrance and calming properties.

Cassia is a “warming” oil that helps promote circulation while maintaining healthy immune function. It can also aid in digestion, lessen nausea, and is a great oil to diffuse during cold months due to its warming properties and spicy scent.

Due to its caustic nature, Cassia should be diluted with Fractionated Coconut Oil when applied to the skin and can be very strong when inhaled directly. When diluted, Cassia can help soothe sore, achy joints. Cassia can be used in cooking either as a replacement for Cinnamon in pies and breads, or by itself in many different entrees and desserts.

Basil-Did You Know?

BasilDid you know basil is helpful for addiction recovery? It gives hope, and confidence to the tired soul. Basil is the essential oil of renewal, and supports those who are under a great deal of mental strain. Basil oil may strengthen the adrenals, and restore the body to its natural rhythms of sleep, activity, and rest. Basil in summary strongly implies to help those who are tired in mind, body, and for those in need of strength, and renewal.

Basil is contained in Hildegard’s Medicine Book. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) was known as the first herbalist and naturopath of the middle ages. Her book documented over 12,000 remedies for symptoms and diseases. Some documented basil benefits, and uses are migraines, insect bites, throat/lung infections, mental fatigue, menstrual periods (scanty), hair (dandruff), aches and pains, insomnia, depression, anxiety, bronchitis, insect repellant (housefly and mosquito) and bites. Basil is amazing.

In Romania there is an old custom that if a boy accepts a sprig of basil from a girl, he is engaged to marry her. It is also tradition that basil was found growing around the tomb of Jesus. In medieval times it was thought that scorpions grew up under pots of basil. in most countries, basil is thought to be a royal herb. “Basil” in Greek, does mean “royal” or “kingly”. This may be because in many regions it was used in perfumes reserved for kings. Basil came to Massachusetts Bay Colony where it was introduced in 1621. From there its cultivation spread through the American Colonies. It has long been used to flavor food in the western world, but was used primarily for its aroma in India.

Basil has a warm, spicy, yet herbal aroma known to enhance memory function while reducing stress and tension. Basil provides restorative benefits to both the mind, and body due to its high linalool content, making it an ideal application for sore muscles, and joints, and to reduce tension when applied to the temples, and back of the neck. Basil is commonly used in cooking. Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.