Category Archives: Did You Know

Melissa-Did You Know?

Melissa Lemon Balm
Did you know Melissa is Greek for “honey bee”? Melissa essential oil is the oil of light. Melissa oil brings to mind truth, and light to the soul. It reminds us of who we are, and why we came to this earth. Melissa invites people to release everything, and anything that holds them back from reaching their greatest potential. When people are feeling weighed down with life’s burdens, Melissa encourages them to keep going.

Melissa also know as Lemon balm has become popular with continued use through the years. So widespread was lemon balm’s reputation for promoting longevity, and dispelling melancholy that by the 17th century, French Carmelite nuns were giving out their Carmelite Water to a faithful following. The lemon-balm infused “miracle water” was thought to improve memory, vision, reduce rheumatic pain, fever, melancholy, and congestion.

In the mid 1500’s to 1700’s when the colonization of the North American continent was occurring, the settlers brought tools, and equipment over with them but more importantly they brought their cherished medical herbal books, and healing plants as well. Lemon balm was one of these herbs of great importance for its many uses. The colonist used lemon balm for cooking, and flavoring, for beverages such as teas and wines, medicine, cosmetic, and house- hold uses such as cleaning, and aromatic uses.

Because of its positive effect on mood, Melissa has long been used to calm tension, and nerves. Diffusing Melissa at night initiates a restful sleep, and promotes emotional, and cognitive health. Melissa helps boost immunity and is especially beneficial when seasonal threats are high. Melissa can also soothe stomach discomfort and help with nausea and indigestion. As one of our rarest and most expensive oils, Melissa has a wide range of health benefits and uses.

Essential Oils in the Bible

Bible
“You love righteousness and hate wickedness; therefore God, Your God, has anointed You with the oil of gladness more than Your companions. All Your garments are scented with myrrh and aloes and cassia, out of the ivory palaces, by which they have made You glad.”
PSALM 45:7-8

Anatomy of a Laugh

Hilarious Funny GirlAnatomy of a Laugh

Your whole body gets a kick out of a good chuckle. Here’s what happens when you laugh, according to research.

  • Your heart and lungs are stimulated.
  • your heart beats faster and your blood pressure rises temporarily.
  • You breathe deeper and oxygenate more blood.
  • Your body releases endorphins, your own natural pain killers, and you produce more immune cells.
  • You burn seventy-eight times as many calories as you would in a resting state.
  • Your diaphragm, facial muscles and internal organs all get bounced around a message sometimes called “internal jogging”

After you’ve laughed, your muscles and arteries relax. That’s great for easing pain. Also, your blood pressure lowers and your pulse drops below normal. Some reachers think all this aids digestion.

A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones.
Proverbs 17:22

The New Engish Bible translation of that verse says that “a merry heart makes a cheerful countenance, but low spirits sap a man’s strength.

Ginger-Did You Know?

GingerDid you know Ginger is the oil of empowerment? It teaches that to be successful in life you must be totally committed to it. Ginger addresses extreme patterns of victim mentality or way of thinking. The victim may also feel stuck, as they transfer or disown responsibility and blame others for their misfortunes.

Ginger is indigenous to Southern China from where it is spread to the Spice islands and other parts of Asia, and subsequently to West Africa and to the Caribbean. Ginger appeared in Europe via India, in the 1st century CE as a result of the lucrative spice trade?

In China, it is strongly believed that ginger boosts and strengthens your heart health. Many people use ginger oil as a measure to prevent various heart conditions. Preliminary research has indicated that ginger may be helpful in reducing cholesterol levels and preventing blood clots. With reduced cholesterol levels and blood clotting, the chance of blood vessel blockage decreases, thereby reducing the incidences of heart attacks and strokes.

Eucalyptus-Did You Know?

Eucalyptus Did you know Eucalyptus is the oil of wellness? Eucalyptus oil supports the person who is constantly facing illness. They may get well for a brief time and season, only to return to a common cold, congestion, or sinus issues. Eucalyptus addresses a deep emotional or spiritual issue for the need to be sick. Eucalyptus encourages everyone to take full ownership of their own health.

All Eucalyptus oils are not the same. Each species produces an oil of different chemical composition and the constituents of one oil may be completely different from an oil from another species. However, eucalyptus oil from the same species is generally remarkably constant in its constituents and chemical composition. Although Eucalyptus must have been seen by the very early European explorers and collectors, no botanical collections of them are known to have been made until 1770 when Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander arrived at Botany Bay with James Cook.

Medicinal Eucalyptus oil produced from E. polybractea is used for the relief of cold and influenza symptoms. It is a remarkable natural product having antiseptic properties and the power to clear the nasal passages and bronchial tubes making it easier to breathe. It is common to vaporize it in saunas. It is an excellent rub for muscular aches and pains, and it has been widely used for many years by athletes to help keep muscles trim and flexible

The main chemical components of Eucalyptus radiata are eucalyptol and alpha terpineol, making it an ideal oil to promote clear breathing and respiratory function. Eucalyptus has purifying properties that can be beneficial for the skin and for cleansing surfaces and the air. Studies have shown that Eucalyptus is effective in helping lessen tension and supports a healthy response to oxidative stress. Eucalyptus can be found in mouth rinses to freshen breath and promote oral health.

Dill-Did You Know?

DillDid you know the Romans believed that dill brought good fortune? The Romans also used dill leaves in the wreaths they made to recognize athletes and heroes. Dill originated in the warm southern regions of Russia, the Mediterranean, and Western Africa. It has been used as a medicinal herb for more than 5,000 years.

Dill was hung over the doorway to the house, making it a symbol of love, and acted as a protection against harm. People who believed in witches would brew a cup of tea brewed from the leaves and seeds of the dill plant to take away their evil power.

Pickles have been around for centuries, yet no one knows exactly when dill was added as a flavoring. There are recipes in England that date back to the 1600s that call for dill to be added to pickled cucumbers. Dill pickles are now the most popular pickle in America. Dill has a strong flavor that enhances the taste of vegetables, meats, and seafood.

Dill has been studied for its ability to help ease constipation, flatulence, headaches, and indigestion. It has helped promote milk flow in nursing mothers. Dill when diffused with Roman chamomile, may help with restless children. Dill has also shown positive signs with pancreas support and clearing toxins. A drop on the wrists may help remove cravings for sweets.