Category Archives: Did You Know

Eucalyptus-Did You Know?

Eucalyptus Did you know Eucalyptus is the oil of wellness? Eucalyptus oil supports the person who is constantly facing illness. They may get well for a brief time and season, only to return to a common cold, congestion, or sinus issues. Eucalyptus addresses a deep emotional or spiritual issue for the need to be sick. Eucalyptus encourages everyone to take full ownership of their own health.

All Eucalyptus oils are not the same. Each species produces an oil of different chemical composition and the constituents of one oil may be completely different from an oil from another species. However, eucalyptus oil from the same species is generally remarkably constant in its constituents and chemical composition. Although Eucalyptus must have been seen by the very early European explorers and collectors, no botanical collections of them are known to have been made until 1770 when Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander arrived at Botany Bay with James Cook.

Medicinal Eucalyptus oil produced from E. polybractea is used for the relief of cold and influenza symptoms. It is a remarkable natural product having antiseptic properties and the power to clear the nasal passages and bronchial tubes making it easier to breathe. It is common to vaporize it in saunas. It is an excellent rub for muscular aches and pains, and it has been widely used for many years by athletes to help keep muscles trim and flexible

The main chemical components of Eucalyptus radiata are eucalyptol and alpha terpineol, making it an ideal oil to promote clear breathing and respiratory function. Eucalyptus has purifying properties that can be beneficial for the skin and for cleansing surfaces and the air. Studies have shown that Eucalyptus is effective in helping lessen tension and supports a healthy response to oxidative stress. Eucalyptus can be found in mouth rinses to freshen breath and promote oral health.

Dill-Did You Know?

DillDid you know the Romans believed that dill brought good fortune? The Romans also used dill leaves in the wreaths they made to recognize athletes and heroes. Dill originated in the warm southern regions of Russia, the Mediterranean, and Western Africa. It has been used as a medicinal herb for more than 5,000 years.

Dill was hung over the doorway to the house, making it a symbol of love, and acted as a protection against harm. People who believed in witches would brew a cup of tea brewed from the leaves and seeds of the dill plant to take away their evil power.

Pickles have been around for centuries, yet no one knows exactly when dill was added as a flavoring. There are recipes in England that date back to the 1600s that call for dill to be added to pickled cucumbers. Dill pickles are now the most popular pickle in America. Dill has a strong flavor that enhances the taste of vegetables, meats, and seafood.

Dill has been studied for its ability to help ease constipation, flatulence, headaches, and indigestion. It has helped promote milk flow in nursing mothers. Dill when diffused with Roman chamomile, may help with restless children. Dill has also shown positive signs with pancreas support and clearing toxins. A drop on the wrists may help remove cravings for sweets.

Cilantro-Did You Know?

Coriander:Cilantro-did you knowDid you know Cilantro essential oil is the oil of releasing control? Cilantro makes the detoxification of emotions and debris. It is helpful in lightening your load through the release of issues buried in the body, heart and soul. Those in need of cilantro may attempt to obsessively control other people or manage their surrounding and conditions.

It is a mystery as to where Cilantro originated, but it is thought by many to be from the Mediterranean region of Europe. No one knows exactly, but it appears that cilantro has been used for at least 5000 years. The seeds, also known as coriander, have even been found in ancient Egyptian tombs. Perhaps this was because the coriander seeds were thought by the ancient herbalists to be an aphrodisiac.

The therapeutic and culinary uses of Cilantro have been documented for centuries. Cilantro contains antioxidants known to protect the body’s cells from oxidative stress. Cilantro promotes healthy digestion and acts as a powerful cleanser and detoxifier for the body’s systems. Applied topically, Cilantro is very soothing and cooling to the skin, and it adds a fresh, herbal aroma to any essential oil blend when diffused.

There is also a large amount of literature speculating that cilantro may be an effective chellation therapy for people who have excess mercury in their systems. Some think that mercury poisoning could be the result of metallic teeth fillings. Every time a person with fillings chews, the fillings release minute amounts of mercury gas that may be breathed into the system. Of course, this is all speculative and disputed. Nevertheless, many people who have suffered from mercury poisoning and the “brain cloud” it causes have reported fairly rapid relief by the consistent consumption of cilantro over a period of just a few weeks.

Cilantro’s culinary uses are endless, adding a flavorful twist to meats, salads, dips, and guacamole. A small amount goes a long way, sometimes a drop is too much and overpowering. Just dipping a toothpick into an essential oil bottle, then using the toothpick for stirring is sufficient.

Cumin-Did You Know?

Cumin The Did You Know GuyDid you know Cumin was used in the ancient Egyptian mummification process? Marcus Antoninus 16th emperor of Rome was given a nickname that referenced the herb as someone miserly must have eaten cumin, and symbolized excessive desire. Pliny the Elder, a Roman naturalist who lived between 23 AD and 79 AD was said to have listed Cumin as “the best appetizer of all condiments.”

The history of Cumin goes back over 5000 years. from Iran and the Mediterranean. Cumin is a small seed that comes from the Cuminum cyminum herb, a member of the parsley family. This seed has a distinct flavor, and warm aroma. It is a major ingredient in chili powder as well as curry powder. According to the Bible, Cumin had such a powerful medicinal value that it could be used as money!

Cumin has an overpowering smell and should be used very sparingly. Yet it is considered non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. It does have photo-toxic qualities, so it should not be used when the skin will be exposed to sunlight. Photosensitization, and photo-toxicity can occur when certain essential oils react when exposed to Ultraviolet UVA light. Inflammation, blistering, and reddening/burning of the skin are common.

Cumin is useful as a warming oil and helps relieve muscular pains and osteoarthritis. In the digestive system, it is a stimulant that helps with colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, bloating and indigestion. For the nervous system, it is a tonic, and has a beneficial effect on headaches, migraines, and nervous exhaustion.

Clove-Did You Know?

clovesDid you know the word clove comes from the French word clov, meaning nail? Clove essential oil is the oil of boundaries helping people to let go of their victim mentality. Clove can assist us in letting go of regular displays of self-betrayal and emotional reliance on a partner by reconnecting them with their personal strong moral values. Clove gives the pushover the power to say “no”.

Each unopened flower bud of the clove tree becomes a clove bud, a tropical evergreen member of the Myrtle family. A clove tree, known botanically as Eugenia aromatica, may live 100 years. They begin producing fruit at seven years and come into full maturity around 25 years. The average crop yield is eight pounds although each year is different. The trees are native to the Moluccas, also known as the Spice Islands.

As early as 200 BC, the Chinese used cloves to freshen their breath during audiences with the emperor. During the late Middle Ages, cloves were used in Europe to preserve, flavor, and garnish food. Clove cultivation was almost entirely confined to Indonesia, because the Dutch government had a monopoly on this valuable spice. Later In the 18th century, the French smuggled cloves from the East Indies to Indian Ocean islands and the New World, breaking the Dutch monopoly on this prized spice.

Clove has been used for years in dental preparations,candy, and gum for its flavor and ability to promote oral health, yet it provides a myriad of health benefits. Its main chemical component, eugenol, makes it a very stimulating and energizing essential oil that can promote blood circulation and benefit cardiovascular health.Due to its high phenol content, caution should be taken when inhaling Clove directly and it should be diluted when applied to the skin. As a cooking spice, Clove adds a spicy flavor to any dish or dessert while providing internal health benefits.

Cinnamon-Did you Know?

Cinnamon BarkDid you know Cinnamon is the oil of sexual harmony and greatly supports the reproductive system and aids with sexual issues? It helps people to embrace their body, and accepting their physical attractiveness. Cinnamon encourages the growth of strong relationships based on mutual love, and respect.

Cinnamon, which is actually the dried bark of the laurel tree a large tropical evergreen tree can grow up to 45 feet tall. Cinnamon has been used for thousands of years. This powerful spice was used in Egypt, Rome, and China. Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka. The “real” cinnamon of old comes from the Cinnamomum zeylanicum tree.

Historically, cinnamon is even mentioned in the Bible. Moses used it as an ingredient for his anointing oils. In ancient Rome, it was burned during funerals, as a way to remove some of the odor of dead bodies. The ancient Egyptians used it in embalming mummies because of its pleasant odors and its preservative qualities.

Extracted from bark, cinnamon oil contains strong cleansing and immune enhancing properties. Due to its high content of cinnamaldehyde, Cinnamon should be diluted with Fractionated Coconut Oil when applied to the skin and only one to two drops are needed for internal benefits.

Cinnamon is very purifying to the circulatory system and it helps promote circulation, both internally and when applied to the skin, helping to ease sore muscles and joints. Cinnamon helps maintain a healthy immune system, especially when seasonal threats are high. When diffused, Cinnamon promotes clear breathing while purifying the air. Cinnamon is frequently used in mouth rinses and gums for its oral health benefits. Cinnamon has a long history of culinary uses, adding spice to desserts, entrees, and hot drinks.