Category Archives: Did You Know

Carrot Seed – Did You Know?

Carrot SeedDid you know that carrot seeds were at one point thought to be a contraceptive? There are many records in history, including Hippocrates, that the seeds were used for birth control. Carrot seed oil is perhaps one of the most under appreciated essential oils. It has been studied for it’s antiseptic, carminative, depurative, diuretic, emmenagogue, and vermifuge properties.

Carrot seed oil has well known health benefits. It nourishes, and tightens skin, helps stimulate an appetite, treats ulcers, improves liver and gall bladder issues and Stimulates the lymph system. Carrot seed oil also helps women with breast milk production after childbirth. It eases hiccups, colic, flatulence, and treats kidney stones and jaundice

Carrot seed oil is said to contain a high SPF factor when diluted with a carrier oil. According to a study published in “Pharmacognosy Magazine” in 2009, products containing carrot seed oil have a natural SPF of between 38 and 40. Determining the exact SPF factor of an oil is difficult, especially given that natural oils oxidize which means they lose some of their medicinal properties.Carrot

Myrtle-Did You Know?

MyrtleDid you know Myrtle is the oil of adaptability? Myrtle instills the soul with qualities helping you to adjust to new conditions, capable of being flexible, and recovering quickly from difficult conditions. Myrtle helps brings joy to the heart allowing things to flow naturally. It is helpful during difficult and challenging times.

The Ancient Egyptians knew of the therapeutic properties of myrtle, macerating the leaves in wine to counter fever and infection. The best and most fragrant myrtle trees came from Egypt. In Biblical times, Jewish women wore garlands of myrtle on their heads on their wedding day as a symbol of love, and to bring them happiness. In 1876, Dr Delioux de Savignac advocated the use of myrtle for bronchial infections, for problems of the urinary and reproductive system, and for hemorrhoids.

A study shows that myrtle oil kills Salmonella on fresh fruits and vegetables. Scientists intentionally inoculated fresh tomatoes, and iceberg lettuce with a strain of Salmonella. Then they used a cleaning solution that had a dilution rate of 1 to 1000 containing myrtle leaf oil to test if it would kill the bacteria. The results suggest that the use of myrtle can be an effective alternative to the use of chlorine or other disinfectants on fruits and vegetables.

Myrtle lowers blood sugar and has been traditionally used in Iran for the treatment of Malaria. It is also known for its ability to repel mosquitoes, and kills fungus, and mold. In some cultures myrtle is used to heal mouth ulcers, warts, and acne.

Coriander-Did You Know?

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Coriander and cilantro come from the same plant. The word coriander can be used to describe the entire plant: leaves, stems, seeds, and all. Most people are referring to the spice produced from the seeds of the coriander plant. The leaves of the plant are commonly called cilantro, which comes from the Spanish word for coriander.

The change in names is very appropriate, since the plant’s leaves and the ripened seeds taste totally different. Cilantro on the other hand is a little too different for many more delicate taste buds, unfortunately. Most people either enjoy or greatly dislike the taste, but I can see why some people argue that it’s an acquired taste.

It’s a different story for the seeds. Coriander is an extremely popular spice with a pleasing aroma and lemony flavor, found in many recipes. Little is known about the origins of the coriander plant, although it is generally thought to be native to the Mediterranean and parts of southwestern Europe.

More recently, coriander plants were known to be growing in Massachusetts by the early 1600’s, one of the first herbs grown by the American colonists. Coriander essential oil promotes digestion and eases stomach upset, aids in a healthy insulin response, soothes joint and muscle pain. Coriander essential oil is also know for toning and rejuvenating to the skin.

Clary Sage-Did You Know?

Clary Sage -Did You KnowDid You Know Clary Sage is the oil of clarity and vision? Clary Sage helps people in changing the way they see things in order to see the truth. Clary Sage helps individuals see their limiting beliefs. It also gives support to people to new ideas, and different ways of looking at the same situation.

It is thought that Clary originated in Syria or south west and central Europe where it can still be found growing wild? It was known to the ancients and the essential oil was prized by Dioscorides a Roman physician, and Pliny a Roman naturalist. This is still used in cosmetics and the perfume industry and is cultivated for these industries in France and Russia. It is a member of the sage family.

Clary Sage Oil can boost self esteem, confidence, and mental strength, thereby efficiently fighting depression. This can be very helpful for forms of depression due to challenges in your career or personal life, insecurity, loneliness, death of a friend or loved one, and many other reasons. Clary Sage oil also relieves anxiety. As an antidepressant, it can be used with patients suffering from acute depression who are undergoing rehabilitation.

Birch-Did You Know?

birchDid you know Birch is the oil of support? Birch offers support to the unsupported. When a person is feeling unsupported or attacked by friends or family, Birch offers courage to help you move in a positive direction alone. It helps assist people overcome negative generation patterns especially when you are being rejected for choosing another path.

Birch trees have been important to many indigenous people in the northern latitudes.  Historically, Birch (Betula papyrifera) as well as other species, were possibly the most important trees for survival. This tree increased the quality of life of people for thousands of years. The fact that the Birch tree varies in thickness and can be split in numerous layers, and that it has a resinous inner bark, which makes it waterproof and resistant to decay. This makes the birch tree extremely versatile.

One of its great uses was for shelter. Native people of what is now the United States, used Birch to make Wigwams, Tee-pees and other structures for living. The inner bark of Paper Birch was used extensively to repel water from structures.  Probably the most well know use of Birch is its use in making canoes. Canoes have been a part of cultures around the world for many hundreds of years.

In Russia, an old folk remedy for rheumatism was to completely cover the afflicted person with Birch leaves, which resulted in a cleansing sweat and subsequent relief. Native Americans prepared a mushy paste by boiling and pounding the bark, so it could be spread on inflammatory skin conditions, ulcers cuts and wounds. The French have used Birch oil for rheumatism, muscular pain,  tendonitis and inflammation.

Birch is very effective in promoting circulation, making it ideal for massage therapy and to soothe sore joints and muscles. Diffusing and inhaling Birch supports clear airways and breathing while stimulating the mind and enhancing focus. Birch can be applied topically and is beneficial in purifying the skin and maintaining a clear, healthy complexion.

Bergamot-Did You Know?

canstockphoto17542085Did you know bergamot essential oil is the oil of Self-Acceptance? Bergamot relieves feelings of despair, low self-esteem, and self-judgment. It supports people in need of a good self esteem. Bergamot invites people to see life with more optimism, it also has a cleansing affect on sluggish feelings and limited belief systems. Bergamot awakens the soul to hope, and offers courage to share their inner-self.

Bergamot has a long history of use in potpourri and perfume recipes. Bergamot oil does many benefits to us and our body we value most. Recent Italian research has shown that Bergamot essential oil has a wide variety of uses in aromatherapy application; Bergamot is unique among citrus oils due to its ability to be both uplifting and calming.

Although a native to the Southern regions of Asia, Bergamot Citrus bergamia is now cultivated primarily in the Calabria region. It also takes its name from an Italian city, that of Bergamot in Lombardy, where the essential oil was originally sold. The Italians have used Bergamot in folk medicine for years, used mainly for fevers. It also promotes healthy, clear skin.

Bergamot essential oil is obtained from the cold expression of the peel of nearly ripe fruit of the Bergamot tree. The small fruit tree is characteristic of the southern Italian landscape: it’s small, round fruit is very bitter and not likely eaten when raw. The fruit looks like a miniature orange. The essential oil obtained from the fruit of the Bergamot tree has a citrus-like aroma but also a spicy undertone.

Bergamot is the most delicate of the citrus plants, Requiring special climate, and soil in order to thrive. Italians have used Bergamot for years to reduce tension, stress, and to soothe, and rejuvenate skin. Bergamot is unique among citrus oils due to its ability to be both uplifting and calming, making it ideal to help with anxious, and sad feelings. It is also purifying, and cleansing for the skin, helping with oily skin conditions, and promoting a smooth, clear complexion while having a calming effect.

Basil-Did You Know?

BasilDid you know basil is helpful for addiction recovery? It gives hope, and confidence to the tired soul. Basil is the essential oil of renewal, and supports those who are under a great deal of mental strain. Basil oil may strengthen the adrenals, and restore the body to its natural rhythms of sleep, activity, and rest. Basil in summary strongly implies to help those who are tired in mind, body, and for those in need of strength, and renewal.

Basil is contained in Hildegard’s Medicine Book. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) was known as the first herbalist and naturopath of the middle ages. Her book documented over 12,000 remedies for symptoms and diseases. Some documented basil benefits, and uses are migraines, insect bites, throat/lung infections, mental fatigue, menstrual periods (scanty), hair (dandruff), aches and pains, insomnia, depression, anxiety, bronchitis, insect repellant (housefly and mosquito) and bites. Basil is amazing.

In Romania there is an old custom that if a boy accepts a sprig of basil from a girl, he is engaged to marry her. It is also tradition that basil was found growing around the tomb of Jesus. In medieval times it was thought that scorpions grew up under pots of basil. in most countries, basil is thought to be a royal herb. “Basil” in Greek, does mean “royal” or “kingly”. This may be because in many regions it was used in perfumes reserved for kings. Basil came to Massachusetts Bay Colony where it was introduced in 1621. From there its cultivation spread through the American Colonies. It has long been used to flavor food in the western world, but was used primarily for its aroma in India.

Basil has a warm, spicy, yet herbal aroma known to enhance memory function while reducing stress and tension. Basil provides restorative benefits to both the mind, and body due to its high linalool content, making it an ideal application for sore muscles, and joints, and to reduce tension when applied to the temples, and back of the neck. Basil is commonly used in cooking. Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.