Tag Archives: Digestion

Rosewood-Did You Know?

Rosewood
Did you know Rosewood essential oil is the oil of sensitivity? Rosewood supports extremely sensitive people that struggle to deal with the stresses that come to them in life. It gives assistance to those who are overstimulated or who experience life as painful due to their unwelcome sensitivities. Rosewood surrounds the excessively sensitive soul with warm nurturing energy.

The wood of this tree is very valuable, and commonly used in cabinet-making, carving building, and essential oil extraction. In the early eighteenth century, Rosewood essential oil was used in the field of perfume making. There was a time when Rosewood was harvested near extinction. As a result these trees have been classified as an endangered species, and the legislation has come up with a resolution that requires the essential oil distilleries to plant a new tree for every tree they use for essential oil extraction.

The benefits of Rosewood essential oil are many. It may shows signs for relief from headaches, toothaches, and joint pain. Rosewood has been studied for its usefulness in treating nausea, vomiting, coughs, stress, and many skin issues. It also keeps the brain cool, active, sharp and alert. Rosewood improves blood circulation, and digestion. This oil has also been studied for its ability to improve memory, and protect people from neurotic disorders. Other uses for Rosewood oil include insecticide, natural deodorant, and may increase libido.

Rosemary-Did You Know?

RosemaryDid you know rosemary assists in the development of true knowledge and true intelligence? Rosemary is the essential oil of knowledge and transition. It challenges people to look deeper than they normally would, and ask more soul searching questions so they may receive more inspired answers. Rosemary also aids in times of transition and change, such as adjusting to a new house, school, or a relationship.

Rosemary is actually a bush perennial that grows in abundance in the Mediterranean area (Spain, Italy, Portugal, Southern France, Greece and North Africa as well as in isolated areas of Turkey, Lebanon and Egypt). It is one of the most common aromatic wild plants of the Mediterranean landscape, especially in rocky limestone hillsides adjoining the seaside.

Rosemary was relocated to England by the Romans in the eighth century, primarily in the southern part of the country. Rosemary branches were placed on the floors of medieval homes to combat diseases during the “black plague.” Because of the fragrance the plant gives off, it was a used as an incense. It was introduced to the New World by early immigrants, but in the northern regions they must be protected in the winter months.

Rosemary is an aromatic, evergreen shrub whose leaves are frequently used to flavor foods such as stuffings and roast lamb, pork, chicken, and turkey. When you add rosemary to spaghetti sauce it will bring out the flavor of other ingredients. It is a very nice addition to tomato-based soups, stews, and sauces. Along with its culinary applications, Rosemary has many health benefits.

Rosemary supports healthy digestion and helps soothe sore muscles and joints. Long revered by healers, rosemary was considered sacred by the ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Hebrew cultures. Rosemary’s herbaceous and energizing scent is frequently used in aromatherapy to combat nervous tension, fatigue, and has antioxidant properties.