Tag Archives: Perfume

Tips on Choosing a Signature Scent


Best article I  have seen on perfumes and colognes. 

I’m writing this for AccordingToKristinSite as she kindly asked me to share some of my perfume thoughts with her readers. There is so much more to perfumery than most people imagine. Therefore, I’ve decided to write a “cliffnotes” version of the things I’ve learned over the last 5 years of my perfume journey. I think […]

via A “Cliffnotes” Guide to Perfume Terms and Tips on Choosing a Signature Scent. — 💜~Fragamour~💜 A Fragrant Affair

Roman Chamomile-Did You Know?

Roman ChamomileDid you know Roman Chamomile oil is the Oil of Spiritual Purpose? Roman Chamomile supports a person who is discovering and living their true purpose in life. Roman Chamomile helps individuals find purpose and meaning in their lives. Chamomile assists the person that is consumed with meaningless activities, helping them focus on more fulfilling work.

The Egyptian’s dedicated Roman Chamomile to the sun and worshiped it above all other herbs for its healing properties and has been used cosmetically for at least 2,000 years. Chamomile was also used by the Romans in medicines, beverages and incense. Ancient Romans used the oil for mental clarity and courage during war.

One place Roman Chamomile grows very well is in the United Kingdom, harvesting takes place during late June or July although heavy rain often causes problems to the farmers schedule. And as if that were not enough, the crop must be harvested at the precise time that it contains the highest yield of essential oil, so this can be quite a challenge to say the least. Other countries that grow Chamomile for the production of essential oil, include Argentina, Belgium, France, Hungary, Italy and the USA.

Roman Chamomile grows close to the ground, reaching only up to a foot in height. It has gray-green leaves, flowers that resemble a daisy, and smells like apple. The plant has been nicknamed the “plant’s physician,” because it has positive effects on plants growing nearby.

While the most common use of chamomile is in teas, Roman Chamomile can also be found in face creams, drinks, hair dyes, shampoos, and perfumes. Roman Chamomile has a therapeutic, calming effect on the skin, mind, and body. It soothes body systems and promotes a healthy inflammatory response.

Lavender-Did You Know?

LavenderDid you know Lavender essential oil is the oil of communication? Lavender helps with verbal expression. It calms the uncertain thoughts that are felt when a person exposes their true feelings. Lavender aids in releasing the tension pressure that comes from the fear of self expression. Lavender encourages emotional honesty by encouraging people to speak their most private thoughts, and desires.

The use of lavender has been recorded for more than 2,500 years. Egyptians, Phoenicians and the people of Arabia used lavender as a perfume, and also for mummification, by wrapping the dead in lavender-dipped shrouds. In ancient Greece, lavender was used as a cure for everything from insomnia, and aching backs to insanity.

By Roman times, lavender had already become a prized commodity. Lavender flowers were sold to ancient Romans for 100 denarii per pound, equivalent to a full month’s wage for a farm laborer, and were used to scent the water in Roman baths. In fact, the baths served as the root of the plant’s current name. “Lavender” is derived from the Latin lavare, meaning, “to wash.” Romans also used lavender as a perfume, insect repellent and flavoring.

The use of lavender was highly revered during the Great Plague of London in the 17th century, when individuals fastened bunches of lavender to each wrist to protect themselves from the Black Death. Thieves who made a living stealing from the graves, and the homes of Plague victims concocted a wash known as “Four Thieves Vinegar,” which contained lavender, to cleanse, and protect themselves after a night’s work. Today, we know the disease was transmitted by fleas, so the use of lavender, which is known to repel these insects, could very well have saved lives, and prevented further spread of the plague.

The Shakers, a strict sect of English Quakers, are credited with commercializing lavender and introducing a variety of lavender-based products to the United States and Canada. The Shakers raised their own herbs, produced medicines, and sold them to neighbors and customers outside their religious sect.

Lavender is frequently used to soothe skin irritations and help skin recover quickly. Applying Lavender to the back of the neck, and temples helps reduce muscle tension. Inhaling Lavender promotes relaxation and a restful night’s sleep, making it an ideal oil to diffuse at bedtime and when stress levels are high. Due to Lavender’s versatility and soothing properties, it is considered the must-have oil to have on hand at all times