Tag Archives: insect Repellant

Arborvitae-Did You Know?

Cut Arborvitae .pngDid you know the Arborvitae has been referred to as the tree of life? A native North American western red cedar tree, can reach 180 to 200 feet in height in some areas of the Northwest but is more often seen at 50 to70 feet in height with a spread of 15 to 25 feet in width. Forming an upright pyramidal silhouette with strongly horizontal branches, Giant-Cedar is an evergreen with fragrant, dark green, delicate needles. This very rare Western Red Cedar will put on 3 to 5 feet of growth per year.

The arborvitae has been used by ancient civilizations to enhance their potential for spiritual communication during rituals and other ceremonies. Modern technology however has revealed that giant Arborvitae essential oil contains high levels of unique compounds called tropolones. Tropolones are an unusual seven membered carbon ring structure not found in significant concentrations in other essential oils. It is these tropolones that yield the unique therapeutic qualities of this oil.

When selecting a source of Arborvitae essential oil, one must be sure to choose a source whose oil does not contain thujone, a neurotoxic compound. Besides source geography, it is also essential to consider the plant part from which this oil is distilled: only essential oil from the wood of Arborvitae has been found to be free from thujone. When sampled and tested for thujone, essential oil from the wood of Arborvitae grown in the Pacific Northwest was found to have no thujone, indicating that oil from this region is safe for human use.

Arborvitae has been used for coughs, fevers and intestinal parasites. It also has antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties. Arborvitae is calming, and has been used as an insect repellent. This oil may also help with skin nourishing and sunscreen. It has a strong effect on the subconscious and unconscious mind.

Arborvitae-Did You Know?

Cut ArborvitaeDid you know the Arborvitae has been referred to as the tree of life? A native North American western red cedar tree, can reach 180 to 200 feet in height in some areas of the Northwest but is more often seen at 50 to70 feet in height with a spread of 15 to 25 feet in width. Forming an upright pyramidal silhouette with strongly horizontal branches, Giant-Cedar is an evergreen with fragrant, dark green, delicate needles. This very rare Western Red Cedar will put on 3 to 5 feet of growth per year.

The arborvitae has been used by ancient civilizations to enhance their potential for spiritual communication during rituals and other ceremonies. Modern technology however has revealed that giant Arborvitae essential oil contains high levels of unique compounds called tropolones. Tropolones are an unusual seven membered carbon ring structure not found in significant concentrations in other essential oils. It is these tropolones that yield the unique therapeutic qualities of this oil.

When selecting a source of Arborvitae essential oil, one must be sure to choose a source whose oil does not contain thujone, a neurotoxic compound. Besides source geography, it is also essential to consider the plant part from which this oil is distilled: only essential oil from the wood of Arborvitae has been found to be free from thujone. When sampled and tested for thujone, essential oil from the wood of Arborvitae grown in the Pacific Northwest was found to have no thujone, indicating that oil from this region is safe for human use.

Arborvitae has been used for coughs, fevers and intestinal parasites. It is also an insect repellent. This oil may also help with skin nourishing and sunscreen. It has a strong effect on the subconscious and unconscious mind.

Myrtle-Did You Know?


MyrtleDid you know Myrtle is the oil of adaptability? Myrtle instills the soul with qualities helping you to adjust to new conditions, capable of being flexible, and recovering quickly from difficult conditions. Myrtle helps brings joy to the heart allowing things to flow naturally. It is helpful during difficult and challenging times.

The Ancient Egyptians knew of the therapeutic properties of myrtle, macerating the leaves in wine to counter fever and infection. The best and most fragrant myrtle trees came from Egypt. In Biblical times, Jewish women wore garlands of myrtle on their heads on their wedding day as a symbol of love, and to bring them happiness. In 1876, Dr Delioux de Savignac advocated the use of myrtle for bronchial infections, for problems of the urinary and reproductive system, and for hemorrhoids.

A study shows that myrtle oil kills Salmonella on fresh fruits and vegetables. Scientists intentionally inoculated fresh tomatoes, and iceberg lettuce with a strain of Salmonella. Then they used a cleaning solution that had a dilution rate of 1 to 1000 containing myrtle leaf oil to test if it would kill the bacteria. The results suggest that the use of myrtle can be an effective alternative to the use of chlorine or other disinfectants on fruits and vegetables.

Myrtle lowers blood sugar and has been traditionally used in Iran for the treatment of Malaria. It is also known for its ability to repel mosquitoes, and kills fungus, and mold. In some cultures myrtle is used to heal mouth ulcers, warts, and acne.

Lavender-Did You Know?

LavenderDid you know Lavender essential oil is the oil of communication? Lavender helps with verbal expression. It calms the uncertain thoughts that are felt when a person exposes their true feelings. Lavender aids in releasing the tension pressure that comes from the fear of self expression. Lavender encourages emotional honesty by encouraging people to speak their most private thoughts, and desires.

The use of lavender has been recorded for more than 2,500 years. Egyptians, Phoenicians and the people of Arabia used lavender as a perfume, and also for mummification, by wrapping the dead in lavender-dipped shrouds. In ancient Greece, lavender was used as a cure for everything from insomnia, and aching backs to insanity.

By Roman times, lavender had already become a prized commodity. Lavender flowers were sold to ancient Romans for 100 denarii per pound, equivalent to a full month’s wage for a farm laborer, and were used to scent the water in Roman baths. In fact, the baths served as the root of the plant’s current name. “Lavender” is derived from the Latin lavare, meaning, “to wash.” Romans also used lavender as a perfume, insect repellent and flavoring.

The use of lavender was highly revered during the Great Plague of London in the 17th century, when individuals fastened bunches of lavender to each wrist to protect themselves from the Black Death. Thieves who made a living stealing from the graves, and the homes of Plague victims concocted a wash known as “Four Thieves Vinegar,” which contained lavender, to cleanse, and protect themselves after a night’s work. Today, we know the disease was transmitted by fleas, so the use of lavender, which is known to repel these insects, could very well have saved lives, and prevented further spread of the plague.

The Shakers, a strict sect of English Quakers, are credited with commercializing lavender and introducing a variety of lavender-based products to the United States and Canada. The Shakers raised their own herbs, produced medicines, and sold them to neighbors and customers outside their religious sect.

Lavender is frequently used to soothe skin irritations and help skin recover quickly. Applying Lavender to the back of the neck, and temples helps reduce muscle tension. Inhaling Lavender promotes relaxation and a restful night’s sleep, making it an ideal oil to diffuse at bedtime and when stress levels are high. Due to Lavender’s versatility and soothing properties, it is considered the must-have oil to have on hand at all times.