Tag Archives: Cleansing

Oregano-Did You Know?

OreganoDid you know the word “oregano” comes from the Greek phrase, “joy of the mountains?” Oregano is the oil of humility and non-attachment. Oregano cuts through the less important parts of life and teaches people to do the same. Oregano is a powerful oil, and may even be described as assertive or intense. Oregano addresses an individual’s need to be “right.”

Ancient Greek physicians discovered that oregano had beneficial properties, and prescribed it for a variety of ailments. Hippocrates used it as well, as its close cousin, Marjoram, as an antiseptic. Just married couples were crowned with wreaths of it. It was also put on graves to give peace to departed spirits.

The use of oregano later spread throughout Europe and much of Northern Africa. In these regions it was used as a spice for meats, fish, and a flavoring for wine. In the middle ages people continued to use it. Oregano was one of few spices used in cooking to give variety to the daily meals.

In spite of its use in England, Oregano was little known in the United States prior to the Second World War. Soldiers discovered the flavors, and aromas during the Italian Campaign, and brought back the spice, and the desire for it. The oregano sold on the spice racks of stores today, is usually made up of several varieties.

Oregano is one of the most potent and powerful essential oils, and has been used for centuries in traditional medicine for its cleansing and immune-boosting properties. The primary chemical components of Oregano are carvacol, and thymol, both in the Phenols group, which possess purifying, and antioxidant properties. Due to its high phenol content, caution should be taken when inhaling or diffusing Oregano; only one to two drops is needed. Additionally, Oregano should be diluted with fractionated coconut oil when applied to the skin.

Oregano essential oil contains phenols—powerful antioxidants that ward off free radicals. One drop taken daily can help maintain healthy immune function; Oregano should be taken more frequently when seasonal threats are high, or as needed to further boost immunity. In addition to being a popular cooking spice, Oregano supports healthy digestion by promoting the secretion of digestive juices. When diffused, Oregano acts as an enhancer and equalizer in essential oil blends, and can help maintain healthy respiratory function.

Myrrh-Did You Know?

MyrrhDid you know Myrrh essential oil is the oil of mother earth? This oil nurtures the soul’s relationship with it’s maternal mother and with the earth. This oil also supports people who have a breakdown of their peaceful connection with the mother-child bond. When this bond has been broken apart, the soul may loose its childlike ability to trust.

Myrrh is nature’s miracle herb. It was one of the three gifts given to Jesus by wise men at His birth. Referenced in the Bible as the Balm of Gilead, Myrrh has been used throughout history as a perfume, incense, and medicine. It was also employed in embalming and religious ceremonies. The name Myrrh is derived from the Arab word ‘morr’ which means ‘bitter’.

Myrrh, botanically, is an aromatic gum resin, an oleoresin to be specific. Oleoresin happens to be a natural blend of a resin and an essential oil. It is obtained from thorny trees of the ‘Commiphora’ genus when a wound in the tree trunk causes it to secrete a resin. The resin has a waxy texture and once harvested, it becomes glossy and hard. The trees are native to regions of Somalia and Ethiopia.

Ancient records show that Myrrh was deemed so valuable that at times it was valued at its weight in gold. Myrrh essential oil is derived from the gummy resin of the small, thorny Myrrh tree and has been used for centuries for its internal and external health benefits. Myrrh has powerful cleansing properties, especially for the mouth and throat. It is also soothing to the skin—promoting a smooth, youthful looking complexion—and promotes emotional balance and well-being.

Grapefruit-Did You Know

GrapefruitDid you Know grapefruit essential oil is the oil of honoring the body? Grapefruit teaches respect, also recognizing, and enjoying the good qualities of one’s physical body. It supports people that have a difficult time honoring their physical body, and are caught in patterns of neglect, and abuse.

Grapefruit was first documented in 1750 by Welshman Rev. Griffith Hughes. The name “grapefruit” is attributed to the fruits growing in clusters which resemble those of grapes. Grapefruit’s origin is in the West Indies since it was never known of in the Orient before the 1800s. The modern grapefruit history began in Florida when in was brought to Florida by the Spaniards in 1823. Initially the tree was grown only for its beauty in gardens. It also has sweet blossoms, and dark glossy leaves.

Very few people ate the grapefruit in the early days. The slightly bitter taste was not enjoyed by most owners who would let the grapefruit ripen, and fall to the ground, and rot there. It was actually visitors from the colder Northern States who first created the demand for grapefruit. In the mid 1800s, people began coming down to Florida by rail-road to spend the winter. They began to like the grapefruit, and wanted to have it when they returned home. Shipments of grapefruit were first sent to New York around 1880.

Grapefruit is known for its energizing and invigorating effect, grapefruit helps reduce mental and physical fatigue. Grapefruit is also renowned for its cleansing, and purifying benefits. It is beneficial for oily skin issues, and helps to purify as it cleanses. Grapefruit is frequently used in skin care for its ability to promote clear, healthy skin, and in weight loss products to support healthy metabolism.

Cinnamon-Did you Know?

Cinnamon BarkDid you know Cinnamon is the oil of sexual harmony and greatly supports the reproductive system and aids with sexual issues? It helps people to embrace their body, and accepting their physical attractiveness. Cinnamon encourages the growth of strong relationships based on mutual love, and respect.

Cinnamon, which is actually the dried bark of the laurel tree a large tropical evergreen tree can grow up to 45 feet tall. Cinnamon has been used for thousands of years. This powerful spice was used in Egypt, Rome, and China. Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka. The “real” cinnamon of old comes from the Cinnamomum zeylanicum tree.

Historically, cinnamon is even mentioned in the Bible. Moses used it as an ingredient for his anointing oils. In ancient Rome, it was burned during funerals, as a way to remove some of the odor of dead bodies. The ancient Egyptians used it in embalming mummies because of its pleasant odors and its preservative qualities.

Extracted from bark, cinnamon oil contains strong cleansing and immune enhancing properties. Due to its high content of cinnamaldehyde, Cinnamon should be diluted with Fractionated Coconut Oil when applied to the skin and only one to two drops are needed for internal benefits.

Cinnamon is very purifying to the circulatory system and it helps promote circulation, both internally and when applied to the skin, helping to ease sore muscles and joints. Cinnamon helps maintain a healthy immune system, especially when seasonal threats are high. When diffused, Cinnamon promotes clear breathing while purifying the air. Cinnamon is frequently used in mouth rinses and gums for its oral health benefits. Cinnamon has a long history of culinary uses, adding spice to desserts, entrees, and hot drinks.