Tag Archives: Digestive System

Fennel-Did You Know?

Fennel

Did you know Fennel essential oil is the oil of responsibility? Fennel supports the person who has a lack of self esteem. This person may feel overwhelmed with life and all the things they are accountable for, having little to zero desire to improve their situation. Fennel is especially important by supporting people to listen and reconnect to the natural messages of the body, where there has been a loss of connection due to emotional eating, severe dieting and even drug abuse.

Fennel can grow up to six feet in height and has delicate, feathery leaves. Most Fennel originated in India, Egypt and China. It also dates back to Pliny the Roman author of Naturalis Historie written between 23-79 AD. He used Fennel for 22 different ailments. Roman warriors were said to have consumed Fennel to make them strong and ready for battle.

We know King Edward I of England consumed large amounts of Fennel because his account book listed a purchase of 8½ pounds. This seed was a one month supply In the 1300s Fennel was used as a condiment and an appetite suppressant. During medieval times, people thought evil spirits could freely move around as the sun moved south. It was thought when Fennel was hung over doorways you were protected from the spirits. Fennel seeds inserted into keyholes were thought to protect homes from ghosts especially in the summer.

Fennel is best known for its distinct licorice aroma and taste, yet its ability to ease digestive troubles, and monthly menstrual cycles are equally noteworthy. Fennel can be added to tea to calm the digestive system, as well as the mind and emotions. Fennel can be very soothing when applied to the abdomen during monthly menstrual cycles, and those same properties can lessen the discomfort associated with minor skin irritations. Fennel is also known to support a healthy lymphatic system.

Cumin-Did You Know?

Cumin The Did You Know GuyDid you know Cumin was used in the ancient Egyptian mummification process? Marcus Antoninus 16th emperor of Rome was given a nickname that referenced the herb as someone miserly must have eaten cumin, and symbolized excessive desire. Pliny the Elder, a Roman naturalist who lived between 23 AD and 79 AD was said to have listed Cumin as “the best appetizer of all condiments.”

The history of Cumin goes back over 5000 years. from Iran and the Mediterranean. Cumin is a small seed that comes from the Cuminum cyminum herb, a member of the parsley family. This seed has a distinct flavor, and warm aroma. It is a major ingredient in chili powder as well as curry powder. According to the Bible, Cumin had such a powerful medicinal value that it could be used as money!

Cumin has an overpowering smell and should be used very sparingly. Yet it is considered non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. It does have photo-toxic qualities, so it should not be used when the skin will be exposed to sunlight. Photosensitization, and photo-toxicity can occur when certain essential oils react when exposed to Ultraviolet UVA light. Inflammation, blistering, and reddening/burning of the skin are common.

Cumin is useful as a warming oil and helps relieve muscular pains and osteoarthritis. In the digestive system, it is a stimulant that helps with colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, bloating and indigestion. For the nervous system, it is a tonic, and has a beneficial effect on headaches, migraines, and nervous exhaustion.

Petitgrain-Did You Know?

petitgrain-orange-leafDid you know petitgrain is the oil of ancestry? Petitgrain brightens patterns and inclinations of unconsciously repeating family mistakes. The person in need of petitgrain is lacking the skills or unwilling to remove themselves from their families way of thinking. Instead they follow in the footsteps of their ancestral traditions.

When I first opened the bottle of petitgrain I couldn’t put my finger on the smell, then it occurred to me that it smells a little bit like fried green tomatoes that I ate a lot of as a child. There are three essential oils that come from the bitter orange tree. Petitgrain is distilled from the leaves and twigs of the tree. Neroli essential oil is distilled from the blossoms and bitter orange oil is produced by cold pressing the rinds of the fruit.

Originally the oil was produced in distilleries from the unripe oranges when they were the size of grapes. This explains why it is named Petitgrain, which in French means little grains. Nevertheless, this proved to be uneconomical and so the oil began being extracted from the leaves and twigs of the orange tree instead.

Historically, petitgrain essential oil has been used for cleaning purposes and it has been used internally to support healthy immune system and nervous system function. Emerging scientific evidence provides support for these tradition and other uses. Adding one or two drops to water or juice may help support the health of cardiovascular, immune, nervous and digestive systems.

Cumin-Did You Know?

Cumin The Did You Know GuyDid you know Cumin was used in the ancient Egyptian mummification process? Marcus Antoninus 16th emperor of Rome was given a nickname that referenced the herb as someone miserly must have eaten cumin, and symbolized excessive desire. Pliny the Elder, a Roman naturalist who lived between 23 AD and 79 AD was said to have listed Cumin as “the best appetizer of all condiments.”

The history of Cumin goes back over 5000 years. from Iran and the Mediterranean. Cumin is a small seed that comes from the Cuminum cyminum herb, a member of the parsley family. This seed has a distinct flavor, and warm aroma. It is a major ingredient in chili powder as well as curry powder. According to the Bible, Cumin had such a powerful medicinal value that it could be used as money!

Cumin has an overpowering smell and should be used very sparingly. Yet it is considered non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. It does have photo-toxic qualities, so it should not be used when the skin will be exposed to sunlight. Photosensitization, and photo-toxicity can occur when certain essential oils react when exposed to Ultraviolet UVA light. Inflammation, blistering, and reddening/burning of the skin are common.

Cumin is useful as a warming oil and helps relieve muscular pains and osteoarthritis. In the digestive system, it is a stimulant that helps with colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, bloating and indigestion. For the nervous system, it is a tonic, and has a beneficial effect on headaches, migraines, and nervous exhaustion.

Fennel-Did You Know?

Fennel
Did you know fennel essential oil is the oil of responsibility? Fennel supports the person who has a lack of self esteem. This person may feel overwhelmed with life and all the things they are accountable for, having little to zero desire to improve their situation. Fennel is especially important by supporting people to listen and reconnect to the natural messages of the body, where there has been a loss of connection due to emotional eating, severe dieting and even drug abuse.

Fennel can grow up to six feet in height and has delicate, feathery leaves. Most fennel originated in India, Egypt and China. It also dates back to Pliny the Roman author of Naturalis Historie written between 23-79 AD. He used fennel for 22 different ailments. Roman warriors were said to have consumed Fennel to make them strong and ready for battle.

We know King Edward I of England consumed large amounts of fennel because his account book listed a purchase of 8½ pounds. This seed was a one month supply. In the 1300s fennel was used as a condiment and an appetite suppressant. During medieval times, people thought evil spirits could freely move around as the sun moved south. It was thought when fennel was hung over doorways you were protected from the spirits. Fennel seeds inserted into keyholes were thought to protect homes from ghosts especially in the summer.

Fennel is best known for its distinct licorice aroma and taste, yet its ability to ease digestive troubles, and monthly menstrual cycles are equally noteworthy. Fennel can be added to tea to calm the digestive system, as well as the mind and emotions. Fennel can be very soothing when applied to the abdomen during monthly menstrual cycles, and those same properties can lessen the discomfort associated with minor skin irritations. Fennel is also known to support a healthy lymphatic system.

Black Pepper-Did You Know?

Pepper cornsDid you know Black Pepper is the oil of unmasking? It reveals the masks and superficial facades people use to hide aspects of one’s self. Since childhood, most of us have been taught that some feelings and behaviors are acceptable while others are not. So instead of seeking to understand feelings and behaviors that appear to be inappropriate, they usually judge and condemn. People learn early in life in order to be loved, and excepted they must hide their negative behaviors behind a mask or facade. Black Pepper helps people find their authentic self.

Black Pepper also comes in green, red, and white all from the same plant. The color is related to how ripe it is and how it has been processed. Black Pepper is the number one selling spice in America. Pepper is native to India, and grows as a tall vine with the peppercorns as flowering drupes. It has been used in cooking for over 2000 years!

Pepper was mostly eaten by the wealthy in the past, as it was so expensive and sought after. Traders formed spice routes from India to Europe and would often fight over them. In the Middle Ages a man’s wealth was measured by his stock pile of pepper. The Romans would even demand pepper as a ransom when besieging a city.

Black Pepper gets its kick from the compound peperine. Black Pepper loses its flavor and aroma through evaporation, so its best to keep it in an airtight container. Consider using whole peppercorns and grinding just before use to maintain flavor, and add near the end of cooking.

Black Pepper essential oil is high in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, known for their antioxidant activity and ability to help ward off environmental and seasonal threats. Black Pepper promotes healthy circulation both internally and externally, but should be used with caution when applied topically due to its strong warming sensation. It may also help curb urges to smoke.