Tag Archives: Indigestion

Dill-Did You Know?

DillDid you know the Romans believed that dill brought good fortune? The Romans also used dill leaves in the wreaths they made to recognize athletes and heroes. Dill originated in the warm southern regions of Russia, the Mediterranean, and Western Africa. It has been used as a medicinal herb for more than 5,000 years.

Dill was hung over the doorway to the house, making it a symbol of love, and acted as a protection against harm. People who believed in witches would brew a cup of tea brewed from the leaves and seeds of the dill plant to take away their evil power.

Pickles have been around for centuries, yet no one knows exactly when dill was added as a flavoring. There are recipes in England that date back to the 1600s that call for dill to be added to pickled cucumbers. Dill pickles are now the most popular pickle in America. Dill has a strong flavor that enhances the taste of vegetables, meats, and seafood.

Dill has been studied for its ability to help ease constipation, flatulence, headaches, and indigestion. It has helped promote milk flow in nursing mothers. Dill when diffused with Roman chamomile, may help with restless children. Dill has also shown positive signs with pancreas support and clearing toxins. A drop on the wrists may help remove cravings for sweets.

Cumin-Did You Know?

Cumin The Did You Know GuyDid you know Cumin was used in the ancient Egyptian mummification process? Marcus Antoninus 16th emperor of Rome was given a nickname that referenced the herb as someone miserly must have eaten cumin, and symbolized excessive desire. Pliny the Elder, a Roman naturalist who lived between 23 AD and 79 AD was said to have listed Cumin as “the best appetizer of all condiments.”

The history of Cumin goes back over 5000 years. from Iran and the Mediterranean. Cumin is a small seed that comes from the Cuminum cyminum herb, a member of the parsley family. This seed has a distinct flavor, and warm aroma. It is a major ingredient in chili powder as well as curry powder. According to the Bible, Cumin had such a powerful medicinal value that it could be used as money!

Cumin has an overpowering smell and should be used very sparingly. Yet it is considered non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. It does have photo-toxic qualities, so it should not be used when the skin will be exposed to sunlight. Photosensitization, and photo-toxicity can occur when certain essential oils react when exposed to Ultraviolet UVA light. Inflammation, blistering, and reddening/burning of the skin are common.

Cumin is useful as a warming oil and helps relieve muscular pains and osteoarthritis. In the digestive system, it is a stimulant that helps with colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, bloating and indigestion. For the nervous system, it is a tonic, and has a beneficial effect on headaches, migraines, and nervous exhaustion.

Yarrow-Did You Know?

yarrowDid you know yarrow is native to Europe? Now commonly found growing wild in North America (except far north). Yarrow is a familiar plant in meadows and fields, along the sides of country lanes, roadsides, on embankments, and in landfills. Yarrow is a member of the daisy family. In many parts of Europe yarrow was believed to protect against all evil.

The yarrow plant was first used by the Greeks over 3,000 years ago for treating wounds on the skin. The flowers and leaves of yarrow were eaten and also made into a tea. The fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding wounds, treat gastrointestinal problems, fight fevers, lessen menstrual bleeding and better circulation. The fresh leaves were also chewed on to relieve tooth aches. Scientists have credited yarrow for its benefits relating to almost every organ in the body.

Yarrow gives strength and energy to the body and mind. It has been studied for its ability to help circulatory disorders like hemorrhoids and varicose veins. Colic, constipation problems, indigestion and cramps are also influenced by using essential oils. Hypertension, Insomnia and other stress related issues are also dealt with using yarrow oil. Many other people claim it is great for allergies, and asthma.

Spearmint-Did You Know?

SpearmintDid you know spearmint has been cultivated for many years? Some believe it would be almost impossible to find it growing in its original form in nature. This species of mint is also known as “Mackerel Mint” The name, spear or spire, refers to the spiry form of its floral blossoming.

Before the invention of the refrigerator, spearmint was once macerated and added to milk because it appeared to lengthen the shelf-life of milk and keep it from curdling. It was also recommended for use by people with poor health or young children with sensitive digestive issues.

Spearmint oil is less used than it’s stronger cousin peppermint. The mint sauces, and jellies that usually accompany lamb dishes are made of the milder-flavored spearmint. It was once recommended as a treatment for hiccups, flatulence as well as indigestion. Spearmint essential oil cleanses, and purifies skin, and has an uplifting scent that can lessen mental, and physical fatigue.

Yarrow-Did You Know?

YarrowDid you know yarrow is native to Europe? Now commonly found growing wild in North America (except far north). Yarrow is a familiar plant in meadows and fields, along the sides of country lanes, roadsides, on embankments, and in landfills. Yarrow is a member of the daisy family. In many parts of Europe yarrow was believed to protect against all evil.

The yarrow plant was first used by the Greeks over 3,000 years ago for treating wounds on the skin. The flowers and leaves of yarrow were eaten and also made into a tea. The fresh leaves were used to stop bleeding wounds, treat gastrointestinal problems, fight fevers, lessen menstrual bleeding and better circulation. The fresh leaves were also chewed on to relieve tooth aches. Scientists have credited yarrow for its benefits relating to almost every organ in the body.

Yarrow gives strength and energy to the body and mind. It has been studied for its ability to help circulatory disorders like hemorrhoids and varicose veins. Colic, constipation problems, indigestion and cramps are also influenced by using essential oils. Hypertension, Insomnia and other stress related issues are also dealt with using yarrow oil. Many other people claim it is great for allergies, and asthma.

Hyssop-Did You Know?

HyssopDid you know Hyssop essential oil is the oil of Identity? Hyssop helps assist people find their true identity. Everyone experiences emotional pain. When the pain continues for long periods of time it is hard to picture your life without it. Hyssop opens people to new levels of light and hope. Hyssop is a gift for those who desire to know their true self.

The name hyssop can be traced back almost unchanged through the Greek and Hebrew meaning ‘holy herb.’ It is uncertain that Hyssopus officinalis is the same ‘hyssop’ referred to in the scriptures, However, it was once regarded as a symbol of purification, and as such was used in the ritual cleansing of churches. It was often planted in monastery gardens, and was used in religious paintings to symbolize humility.

Hyssop essential oil has been studied for its benefits that include feelings of alertness, along with a reduction in fatigue and anxiety. It can also be effective in the case of viral, and respiratory problems. It can help those suffering from colds, sore throats, tonsillitis, coughing, colic, flu, bronchitis, catarrh, and even asthma. It helps with easing  indigestion and gas, and can regulate circulation by lowering blood pressure. Women can use it to prevent water retention during menstruation.

Spearmint-Did You Know?


Spearmint

Did you know Spearmint is the oil of confident speech? Spearmint inspires someone to be clear of thought and mutual verbal expression. The people in need of Spearmint may hide their opinions, thoughts, and ideas by keeping their voice silent. Spearmint promotes confidence when speaking, especially in front of a large group of people.

Spearmint has been cultivated for many years. Some believe it would be almost impossible to find it growing in its original form in nature. This species of mint is also known as “Mackerel Mint” The name, spear or spire, refers to the spiry form of its floral blossoming.

Before the invention of the refrigerator, spearmint was once macerated and added to milk because it appeared to lengthen the shelf-life of milk and keep it from curdling. It was also recommended for use by people with poor health or young children with sensitive digestive issues.

Spearmint oil is less used than it’s stronger cousin peppermint. The mint sauces, and jellies that usually accompany lamb dishes are made of the milder-flavored spearmint. It was once recommended as a treatment for hiccups, flatulence as well as indigestion. Spearmint essential oil cleanses, and purifies skin, and has an uplifting scent that can lessen mental, and physical fatigue.