Category Archives: Better Living

The Slippery Slope

The -Slippery Slope

The slippery slope of prescription drugs with their harmful side effects can be hard to recover from.

Do you want to take back your health using natural essential oils?
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Leonard Fish
5075 Rushton Acres Court
West Valley City, Utah
84120 USA

Nutmeg-Did You Know?

NutmegDid You know Nutmeg comes from the fruit of a 50 ft (15 m) tall tropical evergreen tree? Nutmeg is most commonly used as a cooking spice. The tree grows in Indonesia, New Guinea, and the West Indies. The dried nut and essential oil are both used to enhance your health.

Nutmeg is used in both Western and Chinese herbal medicine. It is most popular as a spice in food and drinks, and is also used in cosmetics and soaps. In ancient Greece, and Rome, nutmeg was highly valued and expensive. People were convinced it stimulated the brain. The Arabs have used nutmeg for centuries.

Nutmeg relaxes the muscles, and helps remove gas from the digestive track. It is most commonly used for stomach problems such as discomfort with indigestion. It is also used for chronic nervous disorders, kidney disorders, and to help with nausea, and vomiting. In Chinese medicine, nutmeg is used to treat abdominal pain, diarrhea, inflammation, impotence, liver disease, and vomiting. Some cultures have been know to use nutmeg as an aphrodisiac.

Myrtle-Did You Know?

MyrtleDid you know Myrtle is the oil of adaptability? Myrtle instills the soul with qualities helping you to adjust to new conditions, capable of being flexible, and recovering quickly from difficult conditions. Myrtle helps brings joy to the heart allowing things to flow naturally. It is helpful during difficult and challenging times.

The Ancient Egyptians knew of the therapeutic properties of myrtle, macerating the leaves in wine to counter fever and infection. The best and most fragrant myrtle trees came from Egypt. In Biblical times, Jewish women wore garlands of myrtle on their heads on their wedding day as a symbol of love, and to bring them happiness. In 1876, Dr Delioux de Savignac advocated the use of myrtle for bronchial infections, for problems of the urinary and reproductive system, and for hemorrhoids.

A study shows that myrtle oil kills Salmonella on fresh fruits and vegetables. Scientists intentionally inoculated fresh tomatoes, and iceberg lettuce with a strain of Salmonella. Then they used a cleaning solution that had a dilution rate of 1 to 1000 containing myrtle leaf oil to test if it would kill the bacteria. The results suggest that the use of myrtle can be an effective alternative to the use of chlorine or other disinfectants on fruits and vegetables.

Myrtle lowers blood sugar and has been traditionally used in Iran for the treatment of Malaria. It is also known for its ability to repel mosquitoes, and kills fungus, and mold. In some cultures myrtle is used to heal mouth ulcers, warts, and acne.

Myrrh-Did You Know?

MyrrhDid you know Myrrh essential oil is the oil of mother earth? This oil nurtures the soul’s relationship with it’s maternal mother and with the earth. This oil also supports people who have a breakdown of their peaceful connection with the mother-child bond. When this bond has been broken apart, the soul may loose its childlike ability to trust.

Myrrh is nature’s miracle herb. It was one of the three gifts given to Jesus by wise men at His birth. Referenced in the Bible as the Balm of Gilead, Myrrh has been used throughout history as a perfume, incense, and medicine. It was also employed in embalming and religious ceremonies. The name Myrrh is derived from the Arab word ‘morr’ which means ‘bitter’.

Myrrh, botanically, is an aromatic gum resin, an oleoresin to be specific. Oleoresin happens to be a natural blend of a resin and an essential oil. It is obtained from thorny trees of the ‘Commiphora’ genus when a wound in the tree trunk causes it to secrete a resin. The resin has a waxy texture and once harvested, it becomes glossy and hard. The trees are native to regions of Somalia and Ethiopia.

Ancient records show that Myrrh was deemed so valuable that at times it was valued at its weight in gold. Myrrh essential oil is derived from the gummy resin of the small, thorny Myrrh tree and has been used for centuries for its internal and external health benefits. Myrrh has powerful cleansing properties, especially for the mouth and throat. It is also soothing to the skin—promoting a smooth, youthful looking complexion—and promotes emotional balance and well-being.

Melissa-Did You Know?

Melissa Lemon Balm
Did you know Melissa is Greek for “honey bee”? Melissa essential oil is the oil of light. Melissa oil brings to mind truth, and light to the soul. It reminds us of who we are, and why we came to this earth. Melissa invites people to release everything, and anything that holds them back from reaching their greatest potential. When people are feeling weighed down with life’s burdens, Melissa encourages them to keep going.

Melissa also know as Lemon balm has become popular with continued use through the years. So widespread was lemon balm’s reputation for promoting longevity, and dispelling melancholy that by the 17th century, French Carmelite nuns were giving out their Carmelite Water to a faithful following. The lemon-balm infused “miracle water” was thought to improve memory, vision, reduce rheumatic pain, fever, melancholy, and congestion.

In the mid 1500’s to 1700’s when the colonization of the North American continent was occurring, the settlers brought tools, and equipment over with them but more importantly they brought their cherished medical herbal books, and healing plants as well. Lemon balm was one of these herbs of great importance for its many uses. The colonist used lemon balm for cooking, and flavoring, for beverages such as teas and wines, medicine, cosmetic, and house- hold uses such as cleaning, and aromatic uses.

Because of its positive effect on mood, Melissa has long been used to calm tension, and nerves. Diffusing Melissa at night initiates a restful sleep, and promotes emotional, and cognitive health. Melissa helps boost immunity and is especially beneficial when seasonal threats are high. Melissa can also soothe stomach discomfort and help with nausea and indigestion. As one of our rarest and most expensive oils, Melissa has a wide range of health benefits and uses.