Tag Archives: Cypress

Cypress-Did You Know?

Cypress-did you know

Did you know Cypress is the oil of motion and flow? Cypress teaches our spirit how to let go of the past by going with the flow of life. Cypress gives support to people by helping them throw aside their worries and let go of control allowing them to enjoy the excitement that comes from being alive, and being fully in the present.

Mediterranean Cypress has been widely cultivated as an ornamental tree for millennia away from its native range, mainly throughout the whole Mediterranean region, and in other areas with similar hot, dry summers and mild, rainy winters. Natural forest stands of the species mainly occur in the western part of the Mediterranean region of Turkey.

It is also known for its very durable, scented wood, used most famously for the doors of St Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City, Rome. The Mediterranean Cypress is also known as the “drama tree” because of its tendency to bend with even the slightest of breezes.

Cypress oil is known to mankind since ancient times and has been used in many traditional medicines. Aromatherapy has been another important usage of this essential oil which has been a common practice for a long time. It is also known for the cross on which Jesus was crucified was made from the wood of cypress tree.

The oil from the cypress tree assists with clear breathing. Promotes healthy respiratory function. Soothes tight, tense muscles. Supports localized blood flow. Beneficial for oily skin conditions. It has a grounding, yet stimulating effect on the emotions, making it a popular oil to diffuse during times of transition or loss.

Cypress-Did You Know?

Cypress-did you knowDid you know Cypress is the oil of motion and flow? Cypress teaches our spirit how to let go of the past by going with the flow of life. Cypress gives support to people by helping them throw aside their worries and let go of control allowing them to enjoy the excitement that comes from being alive, and being fully in the present.

Mediterranean Cypress has been widely cultivated as an ornamental tree for millennia away from its native range, mainly throughout the whole Mediterranean region, and in other areas with similar hot, dry summers and mild, rainy winters. Natural forest stands of the species mainly occur in the western part of the Mediterranean region of Turkey.

It is also known for its very durable, scented wood, used most famously for the doors of St Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City, Rome. The Mediterranean Cypress is also known as the “drama tree” because of its tendency to bend with even the slightest of breezes.

Cypress oil is known to mankind since ancient times and has been used in many traditional medicines. Aromatherapy has been another important usage of this essential oil which has been a common practice for a long time. It is also known for the cross on which Jesus was crucified was made from the wood of cypress tree.

The oil from the cypress tree assists with clear breathing. Promotes healthy respiratory function. Soothes tight, tense muscles. Supports localized blood flow. Beneficial for oily skin conditions. It has a grounding, yet stimulating effect on the emotions, making it a popular oil to diffuse during times of transition or loss.

Essential Oils Studied for Antibacterial Properties

Studied for Antibacterial Properties
The term antibacterial refers to anything that kills bacteria or limits its ability to grow or reproduce.

Basil Essential Oil
Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.
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Cassia Essential Oil
When diluted, Cassia can help soothe sore, achy joints. Cassia can be used in cooking either as a replacement for Cinnamon in pies and breads, or by itself in many different entrees and desserts.
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Cedarwood Essential Oils
Cedarwood will help maintain healthy breathing and respiratory function and, when applied topically, Cedarwood promotes clear, healthy skin. This oil is also used in massage therapy to relax the mind and body.
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Cinnamon Essential Oil

Cinnamon is strong, so be sure to dilute it (3 drops of carrier oil to 1 drop of cinnamon), but you can cook, bake, or even make candy with it too.
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Clove Essential Oil
Clove has been used for years in dental preparations,candy, and gum for its flavor and ability to promote oral health, yet it provides a myriad of health benefits.
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Cypress Essential Oil

Cypress assists with clear breathing, and promotes healthy respiratory function. It also soothes tight muscles and supports localized blood flow. This oil is helpful for oily skin conditions.
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Geranium Essential Oil

This oil has been used to promote clear skin and healthy hair, making it ideal for skin and hair care products. It also helps calm nerves and lessen stress.
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Helichrysum Essential Oil
Helichrysum is great for regenerative effects, can be used without dilution for most people. No first aide kit should be without this oil.
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Lemongrass Essential Oil
This oil supports healthy digestion, and soothes aching muscles. Lemongrass purifies and tones skin, and acts as an overall tonic to the body’s systems.
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Lime Essential Oil
Lime oil can usually be used without diluting, depending on skin sensitivity, and can be taken internally, but like all citrus oils, it can cause sensitivity to the sun with topical use up to 12 hours prior, so using it before bed is a great option.
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Melaleuca Essential Oil
Melaleuca is best known for its purifying properties. It can be used to cleanse and purify. Taken internally, Melaleuca enhances immunity when seasonal threats are high.
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Oregano Essential Oil
Oregano is one of the most potent essential oils. It must be diluted (3 drops of carrier oil to 1 drop of Oregano essential oil when used topically). Apply to reflex points. It can be used as a flavoring in cooking.
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Peppermint Essential Oil
Peppermint is very pleasing to the taste buds (you can add the oil to tea or water), but is powerfully soothing to the digestive system. You can usually apply it without diluting, inhale for nausea, or take internally as suggested.
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Rosemary Essential Oil

Rosemary supports healthy digestion and helps soothe sore muscles and joints. This oil also helps reduce nervous tension and fatigue.
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Thyme Essential Oil

Thyme makes a great defense against many concerns, although it should always be diluted (4 drops carrier oil to 1 drop thyme). You can also cook with it. This oil has cleansing and purifying effects for the skin.
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Cypress-Did You Know?

CypressDid you know Cypress is the oil of motion and flow? Cypress teaches our spirit how to let go of the past by going with the flow of life. Cypress gives support to people by helping them throw aside their worries and let go of control allowing them to enjoy the excitement that comes from being alive, and being fully in the present.

Mediterranean Cypress has been widely cultivated as an ornamental tree for millennia away from its native range, mainly throughout the whole Mediterranean region, and in other areas with similar hot, dry summers and mild, rainy winters. Natural forest stands of the species mainly occur in the western part of the Mediterranean region of Turkey.

It is also known for its very durable, scented wood, used most famously for the doors of St Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City, Rome. The Mediterranean Cypress is also known as the “drama tree” because of its tendency to bend with even the slightest of breezes.

Cypress oil is known to mankind since ancient times and has been used in many traditional medicines. Aromatherapy has been another important usage of this essential oil which has been a common practice for a long time. It is also known for the cross on which Jesus was crucified was made from the wood of cypress tree.

The oil from the cypress tree assists with clear breathing. Promotes healthy respiratory function. Soothes tight, tense muscles. Supports localized blood flow. Beneficial for oily skin conditions. It has a grounding, yet stimulating effect on the emotions, making it a popular oil to diffuse during times of transition or loss.

The 12 Rules for Safety with Essential Oils

The 12 Rules for Safety with Essential Oils

By David Stewart

1. Keep them out of the reach of children. Consider them as you would any therapeutic product in your home.

2. Keep a bottle of vegetable oil handy. It will dilute an essential oil and slow down its rate of absorption if there should be any discomfort or skin irritation.

3. People with sensitive skin can use a patch test to determine if they would react to a particular oil. It is generally safe to apply essential oils to the soles of the feet even for people with sensitive skin.

4. Pregnant women should consult their healthcare professional before using essential oils. Those oils with hormonal quality should probably be avoided during pregnancy. Some of these oils are: sage, clary sage, blue tansy, tarragon, niaouli, cypress, myrtle and wild tansy.

5. Essential oils rich in phenols (the hot oils) should be used with caution when applying to the skin. Use caution when apply to any sensitive areas, such as the throat and face. Before applying oils to the tender skin of young children.

6. Keep essential oils away from the eye area where even the vapors can cause irritation. Do not handle contact lenses or rub the eyes with essential oils on your fingers. Oils with high phenol content can damage lenses and irritate eyes. If essential oils accidentally get in the eyes, pour vegetable oil in the eyes to stop the burning. Don’t use water. Water will drive the oils in faster increasing the burning sensation.

7. Essential oils may be applied on or around the ears, but don’t pour essential oils directly into the ears.

8. People with epilepsy, high blood pressure, or who are prone to convulsions should consult a healthcare professional before using essential oils. Hyssop, fennel, and wild tansy oils should probably be avoided in these cases.

9. Most commonly used essential oils have been designated by the FDA as being “Generally Regarded as Safe” for oral usage. This designation is abbreviated as “GRAS.”  Before ingesting, GRAS oils may be, at your option, diluted with honey, milk, rice milk, olive oil, or other lipid dissolving liquid.

10.  In using essential oils in bath water, first add a dispersant, like a gel or liquid soap, to avoid concentrated droplets that can sometimes gravitate to sensitive areas of the body. There are always ways to safely disperse oils in a bath given in most books on applied aromatherapy.

11.  Some oils are phototoxic. When applied to the skin, avoid direct sunlight or the rays of healing lamps for at least 12 hours afterwards. These oils are: Angelica, Bergamot, Bitter Orange, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Petitgrain and Rue.

12.  Keep essential oils in tightly closed glass bottles away from light and stored in cool places. (Normal room temperatures are cool enough.)  In this way, they will maintain their balanced chemical composition in potency indefinitely.

All things considered, essential oils are among the safest of all therapeutic modalities and one that is safe enough for even amateurs and untrained users.  Nevertheless, the more you know and understand about essential oils, the better and safer your results will be.