Tag Archives: Flavoring

Lemon-Did You Know?

Lemon

Did you know lemon essential oil is the oil of focus? Lemon is a fantastic aid for children that have a difficult time with school. Lemon’s specialty is helping people with with learning disorders to focus. Lemon clears self-judgement about learning, such as, “I am stupid” Lemon calms fears, and uncertain feelings while bringing back confidence in ones self.

Lemon came into full culinary use in Europe in the 15th century? The first major cultivation in Europe began in Genoa. Lemons came to the New World in 1493, when Christopher Columbus brought lemon seeds to Hispaniola. Spanish conquest spread the lemon throughout the New World, where it was still used mainly used as an ornamental plant, and for medicine. Lemons were grown in California by 1751; and in the 1800s in Florida, they began to be used in cooking and flavoring.

Lemon oil is calming in nature and therefore helps with mental fatigue, exhaustion, dizziness, anxiety, nervousness and nervous tension. It has the ability to refresh the mind by creating a positive mindset and removing negative emotions. It is also believed that inhaling lemon oil helps in increasing concentration and alertness. It can therefore be used as a room freshener in offices to increase the efficiency of the employees.

Cumin-Did You Know?

Cumin The Did You Know GuyDid you know Cumin was used in the ancient Egyptian mummification process? Marcus Antoninus 16th emperor of Rome was given a nickname that referenced the herb as someone miserly must have eaten cumin, and symbolized excessive desire. Pliny the Elder, a Roman naturalist who lived between 23 AD and 79 AD was said to have listed Cumin as “the best appetizer of all condiments.”

The history of Cumin goes back over 5000 years. from Iran and the Mediterranean. Cumin is a small seed that comes from the Cuminum cyminum herb, a member of the parsley family. This seed has a distinct flavor, and warm aroma. It is a major ingredient in chili powder as well as curry powder. According to the Bible, Cumin had such a powerful medicinal value that it could be used as money!

Cumin has an overpowering smell and should be used very sparingly. Yet it is considered non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. It does have photo-toxic qualities, so it should not be used when the skin will be exposed to sunlight. Photosensitization, and photo-toxicity can occur when certain essential oils react when exposed to Ultraviolet UVA light. Inflammation, blistering, and reddening/burning of the skin are common.

Cumin is useful as a warming oil and helps relieve muscular pains and osteoarthritis. In the digestive system, it is a stimulant that helps with colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, bloating and indigestion. For the nervous system, it is a tonic, and has a beneficial effect on headaches, migraines, and nervous exhaustion.

Rosemary-Did You Know?

RosemaryDid you know rosemary assists in the development of true knowledge and true intelligence? Rosemary is the essential oil of knowledge and transition. It challenges people to look deeper than they normally would, and ask more soul searching questions so they may receive more inspired answers. Rosemary also aids in times of transition and change, such as adjusting to a new house, school, or a relationship.

Rosemary is actually a bush perennial that grows in abundance in the Mediterranean area (Spain, Italy, Portugal, Southern France, Greece and North Africa as well as in isolated areas of Turkey, Lebanon and Egypt). It is one of the most common aromatic wild plants of the Mediterranean landscape, especially in rocky limestone hillsides adjoining the seaside.

Rosemary was relocated to England by the Romans in the eighth century, primarily in the southern part of the country. Rosemary branches were placed on the floors of medieval homes to combat diseases during the “black plague.” Because of the fragrance the plant gives off, it was a used as an incense. It was introduced to the New World by early immigrants, but in the northern regions they must be protected in the winter months.

Rosemary is an aromatic, evergreen shrub whose leaves are frequently used to flavor foods such as stuffings and roast lamb, pork, chicken, and turkey. When you add rosemary to spaghetti sauce it will bring out the flavor of other ingredients. It is a very nice addition to tomato-based soups, stews, and sauces. Along with its culinary applications, Rosemary has many health benefits.

Rosemary supports healthy digestion and helps soothe sore muscles and joints. Long revered by healers, rosemary was considered sacred by the ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Hebrew cultures. Rosemary’s herbaceous and energizing scent is frequently used in aromatherapy to combat nervous tension, fatigue, and has antioxidant properties.

Spearmint-Did You Know?

SpearmintDid you know spearmint has been cultivated for many years? Some believe it would be almost impossible to find it growing in its original form in nature. This species of mint is also known as “Mackerel Mint” The name, spear or spire, refers to the spiry form of its floral blossoming.

Before the invention of the refrigerator, spearmint was once macerated and added to milk because it appeared to lengthen the shelf-life of milk and keep it from curdling. It was also recommended for use by people with poor health or young children with sensitive digestive issues.

Spearmint oil is less used than it’s stronger cousin peppermint. The mint sauces, and jellies that usually accompany lamb dishes are made of the milder-flavored spearmint. It was once recommended as a treatment for hiccups, flatulence as well as indigestion. Spearmint essential oil cleanses, and purifies skin, and has an uplifting scent that can lessen mental, and physical fatigue.

Lime-Did you Know?

limeDid you know limes probably originated in Indonesia or the nearby mainland of Asia? Limes were introduced to the western Mediterranean countries by returning crusaders in the 12th and 13th centuries. Columbus took citrus-fruit seed, probably including limes, to the West Indies on his second voyage in 1493, and the trees soon became widely distributed in the West Indies, Mexico, and Florida.

Scottish naval surgeon Sir James Lind discovered by his observation of long-haul sailors that citrus fruits wiped out the horrible scurvy. This disease is caused by a lack of vitamin C, which had destroyed the British navy more than any enemy. It was noted that seamen that drank lime juice dramatically reduced their mortality rate.

Cold-pressed from the peel of fresh limes, Lime essential oil is refreshing, and energizing in both aroma, and taste. Limes are frequently used in entrées, and beverages for their fresh, citrus flavor. Lime essential oil contains powerful antioxidants that ward off free radicals, and enhance immunity.

Due to its high limonene content, Lime provides internal cleansing benefits, and can be diffused to help purify the air. It’s also an effective and natural surface cleaner. Lime is known for its ability to uplift mood, and balance and energize the mind, and body. Lime is frequently used in facial and body cleansers for its purifying properties, and uplifting scent.

Lime essential oil is the Oil of Zest For Life. Lime permeates the soul with enthusiasm for life, when a person has been overwhelmed by discouragement or deep sorrow. Lime elevates them above their difficulties, and reminds them to have gratitude for the gift of life. This oil encourages balance between the heart, and mind.