Tag Archives: Symbol of love

Myrtle-Did You Know?

MyrtleDid you know Myrtle is the oil of adaptability? Myrtle instills the soul with qualities helping you to adjust to new conditions, capable of being flexible, and recovering quickly from difficult conditions. Myrtle helps brings joy to the heart allowing things to flow naturally. It is helpful during difficult and challenging times.

The Ancient Egyptians knew of the therapeutic properties of myrtle, macerating the leaves in wine to counter fever and infection. The best and most fragrant myrtle trees came from Egypt. In Biblical times, Jewish women wore garlands of myrtle on their heads on their wedding day as a symbol of love, and to bring them happiness. In 1876, Dr Delioux de Savignac advocated the use of myrtle for bronchial infections, for problems of the urinary and reproductive system, and for hemorrhoids.

A study shows that myrtle oil kills Salmonella on fresh fruits and vegetables. Scientists intentionally inoculated fresh tomatoes, and iceberg lettuce with a strain of Salmonella. Then they used a cleaning solution that had a dilution rate of 1 to 1000 containing myrtle leaf oil to test if it would kill the bacteria. The results suggest that the use of myrtle can be an effective alternative to the use of chlorine or other disinfectants on fruits and vegetables.

Myrtle lowers blood sugar and has been traditionally used in Iran for the treatment of Malaria. It is also known for its ability to repel mosquitoes, and kills fungus, and mold. In some cultures myrtle is used to heal mouth ulcers, warts, and acne.

Dill-Did You Know?

Dill

Did you know the Romans believed that dill brought good fortune? The Romans also used dill leaves in the wreaths they made to recognize athletes and heroes. Dill originated in the warm southern regions of Russia, the Mediterranean, and Western Africa. It has been used as a medicinal herb for more than 5,000 years.

Dill was hung over the doorway to the house, making it a symbol of love, and acted as a protection against harm. People who believed in witches would brew a cup of tea brewed from the leaves and seeds of the dill plant to take away their evil power.

Pickles have been around for centuries, yet no one knows exactly when dill was added as a flavoring. There are recipes in England that date back to the 1600s that call for dill to be added to pickled cucumbers. Dill pickles are now the most popular pickle in America. Dill has a strong flavor that enhances the taste of vegetables, meats, and seafood.

Dill has been studied for its ability to help ease constipation, flatulence, headaches, and indigestion. It has helped promote milk flow in nursing mothers. Dill when diffused with Roman chamomile, may help with restless children. Dill has also shown positive signs with pancreas support and clearing toxins. A drop on the wrists may help remove cravings for sweets.