Tag Archives: Insomnia

Lavender-Did You Know?

LavenderDid you know Lavender essential oil is the oil of communication? Lavender helps with verbal expression. It calms the uncertain thoughts that are felt when a person exposes their true feelings. Lavender aids in releasing the tension pressure that comes from the fear of self expression. Lavender encourages emotional honesty by encouraging people to speak their most private thoughts, and desires.

The use of lavender has been recorded for more than 2,500 years. Egyptians, Phoenicians and the people of Arabia used lavender as a perfume, and also for mummification, by wrapping the dead in lavender-dipped shrouds. In ancient Greece, lavender was used as a cure for everything from insomnia, and aching backs to insanity.

By Roman times, lavender had already become a prized commodity. Lavender flowers were sold to ancient Romans for 100 denarii per pound, equivalent to a full month’s wage for a farm laborer, and were used to scent the water in Roman baths. In fact, the baths served as the root of the plant’s current name. “Lavender” is derived from the Latin lavare, meaning, “to wash.” Romans also used lavender as a perfume, insect repellent and flavoring.

The use of lavender was highly revered during the Great Plague of London in the 17th century, when individuals fastened bunches of lavender to each wrist to protect themselves from the Black Death. Thieves who made a living stealing from the graves, and the homes of Plague victims concocted a wash known as “Four Thieves Vinegar,” which contained lavender, to cleanse, and protect themselves after a night’s work. Today, we know the disease was transmitted by fleas, so the use of lavender, which is known to repel these insects, could very well have saved lives, and prevented further spread of the plague.

The Shakers, a strict sect of English Quakers, are credited with commercializing lavender and introducing a variety of lavender-based products to the United States and Canada. The Shakers raised their own herbs, produced medicines, and sold them to neighbors and customers outside their religious sect.

Lavender is frequently used to soothe skin irritations and help skin recover quickly. Applying Lavender to the back of the neck, and temples helps reduce muscle tension. Inhaling Lavender promotes relaxation and a restful night’s sleep, making it an ideal oil to diffuse at bedtime and when stress levels are high. Due to Lavender’s versatility and soothing properties, it is considered the must-have oil to have on hand at all times

Basil-Did You Know?

BasilDid you know basil is helpful for addiction recovery? It gives hope, and confidence to the tired soul. Basil is the essential oil of renewal, and supports those who are under a great deal of mental strain. Basil oil may strengthen the adrenals, and restore the body to its natural rhythms of sleep, activity, and rest. Basil in summary strongly implies to help those who are tired in mind, body, and for those in need of strength, and renewal.

Basil is contained in Hildegard’s Medicine Book. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) was known as the first herbalist and naturopath of the middle ages. Her book documented over 12,000 remedies for symptoms and diseases. Some documented basil benefits, and uses are migraines, insect bites, throat/lung infections, mental fatigue, menstrual periods (scanty), hair (dandruff), aches and pains, insomnia, depression, anxiety, bronchitis, insect repellant (housefly and mosquito) and bites. Basil is amazing.

In Romania there is an old custom that if a boy accepts a sprig of basil from a girl, he is engaged to marry her. It is also tradition that basil was found growing around the tomb of Jesus. In medieval times it was thought that scorpions grew up under pots of basil. in most countries, basil is thought to be a royal herb. “Basil” in Greek, does mean “royal” or “kingly”. This may be because in many regions it was used in perfumes reserved for kings. Basil came to Massachusetts Bay Colony where it was introduced in 1621. From there its cultivation spread through the American Colonies. It has long been used to flavor food in the western world, but was used primarily for its aroma in India.

Basil has a warm, spicy, yet herbal aroma known to enhance memory function while reducing stress and tension. Basil provides restorative benefits to both the mind, and body due to its high linalool content, making it an ideal application for sore muscles, and joints, and to reduce tension when applied to the temples, and back of the neck. Basil is commonly used in cooking. Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.