Tag Archives: aches and pains

Wintergreen-Did You Know?

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Did you know Wintergreen is the oil of surrender? It can help the strong-willed person in letting go of the need to be right, and the need to know. Wintergreen reminds a person that they don’t have to do things on their own. There is a constant invitation to abandon one’s burdens to a higher Power.

The wintergreen is a perennial that is native to the eastern portion of North America? North American Indians chewed the leaves of the wintergreen plant for their distinct flavor, used them in the treatment of aches and pains, and to aid in breathing during hard work.

In the past, wintergreen was used internally to treat chronic mucous discharges, regulate hormones, and as a diuretic; due to its toxicity it is no longer used internally for medicinal purposes. Wintergreen is commonly used in very small amounts to adjust the flavor in candies, chewing gum, herbal teas, mouthwashes, toothpastes, and various beverages. It is also found in insect repellents and insecticidal products.

Wintergreen has a warming effect when applied to skin and is excellent to use in a massage to relieve sore muscles. A little goes a long way, so use sparingly and dilute with Fractionated Coconut Oil to minimize any skin sensitivity. For a soothing bath, add 1–2 drops of Wintergreen essential oil to warm bath water. Wintergreen essential oil is not recommended for internal use and should be stored out of reach from children.

Basil-Did You Know?

BasilDid you know basil is helpful for addiction recovery? It gives hope, and confidence to the tired soul. Basil is the essential oil of renewal, and supports those who are under a great deal of mental strain. Basil oil may strengthen the adrenals, and restore the body to its natural rhythms of sleep, activity, and rest. Basil in summary strongly implies to help those who are tired in mind, body, and for those in need of strength, and renewal.

Basil is contained in Hildegard’s Medicine Book. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) was known as the first herbalist and naturopath of the middle ages. Her book documented over 12,000 remedies for symptoms and diseases. Some documented basil benefits, and uses are migraines, insect bites, throat/lung infections, mental fatigue, menstrual periods (scanty), hair (dandruff), aches and pains, insomnia, depression, anxiety, bronchitis, insect repellant (housefly and mosquito) and bites. Basil is amazing.

In Romania there is an old custom that if a boy accepts a sprig of basil from a girl, he is engaged to marry her. It is also tradition that basil was found growing around the tomb of Jesus. In medieval times it was thought that scorpions grew up under pots of basil. in most countries, basil is thought to be a royal herb. “Basil” in Greek, does mean “royal” or “kingly”. This may be because in many regions it was used in perfumes reserved for kings. Basil came to Massachusetts Bay Colony where it was introduced in 1621. From there its cultivation spread through the American Colonies. It has long been used to flavor food in the western world, but was used primarily for its aroma in India.

Basil has a warm, spicy, yet herbal aroma known to enhance memory function while reducing stress and tension. Basil provides restorative benefits to both the mind, and body due to its high linalool content, making it an ideal application for sore muscles, and joints, and to reduce tension when applied to the temples, and back of the neck. Basil is commonly used in cooking. Basil is cooling to the skin, and can be used to soothe minor irritations. When diffused, Basil helps promote clear breathing, and healthy respiratory function while sharpening focus, and lessening stress.